Do I Qualify? Widget

Reviews on Zillow
3126365
"Amazing team! I highly recommend them. Fast, efficient and sold out home in 3 weeks. Our home is one of your biggest assets and didn't want to just ... more "
5.0/5.0
by jalhammond
2911178
"Rick was very helpful in the search process, selection and purchase. He was very laid back but at the same time was always available and always ... more "
5.0/5.0
by AndreaWalsh7

Monday, June 30, 2008

Chautauqua Lake Idol


 

 

A crowd is seen enjoying the 2007 Chautauqua Lake Idol competition at the Floating Stage in Bemus Point. The 2008 Chautauqua Lake Idol competition is slated to begin tonight.
P-J photo by Nicholas L. Dean

BEMUS POINT - Organizers are ready to kick off the fifth season of Chautauqua Lake Idol today at the Floating Stage in Bemus Point, eager to entertain the thousands that come out on six nights in June, July and August.

Though almost down to a science after four successful years, mounting the production is still a challenge according to Media One Group officials.

''We certainly have developed a routine after producing more than 20 shows, but we still encounter some hurdles from week to week,'' said Andrew Hill, SE93 Chautauqua Lake Idol producer. ''From making sure the band has the correct audio to practice with, coordinating the special features we may have from week to week, coordinating and approving the song choices, and keeping the show fresh and entertaining can all be challenging.''

As host of the contest, Hill shares the stage with all the performers, band members and judges, and says it is exciting for everyone to be a part of the event because it is such a popular program.

According to Hill, each of the contest's six nights are unique and interesting for those who come to watch - as each night features different themes and the contest as a whole changes as more and more singers are eliminated.

''The first weeks are exciting because everyone is discovering who the singers are, and the audience picks the person they think will win,'' Hill said. ''The middle weeks force the singers to adjust to what the judges are looking for, and they are trying to become creative and showcase their individual talents. The finals weeks are exciting because you're narrowed down to the finalists, and they need to do something to put them over the top.''

After competing in an open audition at the Jamestown Savings Bank Ice Arena, 20 singers were chosen to compete in this year's contest.

The 20 singers selected to compete in the 2008 Chautauqua Lake Idol Regional Vocal Contest are Brent Ball, of Findley Lake; Marvin Brandi, of Jamestown; Bethany Bush, of Randolph; Karen Buck, of Jamestown; Laura Carlson, of Jamestown; Brian Chase, of Jamestown; Rachel Curtin, of Fredonia; Katie Elfman, of Jamestown; Kenny Fabritius, of Sinclairville; Julie Haight, of Jamestown; Danielle Kenney, of Youngsville, Pa.; Burke Lindquist, of Derby; Jay Manaco, of Mayville; Margie Nelsen, of Mayville; Sherilynn Rossell, of Jamestown; Tammy Russell, of Falconer; Billy Thomas, of Frewsburg; Stephanie Tompkins, of Jamestown; Kristen Vandstrom, of Jamestown and Carol Westerdahl, of Jamestown.

Organized each year by WWSE 93.3 FM, Chautauqua Lake Idol is fun for first-time visitors and those who regularly attend each year, according to Hill.

''I think what we have created is a venue for families and friends to come and have a good time, regardless of if it's their first time or not,'' Hill said. ''They enjoy listening to the different interpretation of the music selections, and come so they can be involved with the water cooler conversations the next morning at the office. We try to keep things new and fresh, but also believe you should not fix something that isn't broken.

''We are honored to have become a routine for the residents and tourists who make us part of their summer,'' Hill continued. ''We field many calls during the spring from those making their vacation plans around our schedule of events. The combination of the perfect venue, the supportive audience and our sponsors has truly helped this show continue from year to year. We are excited for our fifth season.''

The 2008 Chautauqua Lake Idol Regional Vocal Competition will consist of six shows. Beginning today, the competition will be comprised of two preliminary rounds, three theme nights and a finals night. For more information about the annual event, visit www.chautauqualakeidol.com or the Media One Group studios. Questions can also be directed to WWSE 93.3 FM by calling 487-1151.

 

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com


 

Sunday, June 29, 2008

Over $429,000 in funding awarded for Stow Ferry

Sens. Charles E. Schumer and Hillary Rodham Clinton announced $429,033 of U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) funding for Chautauqua County. The DOT grant will support improvements for the Bemus Point-Stow Ferry.

"The Bemus Point-Stow Ferry is a gem of Chautauqua County, providing both a snapshot of the area's vibrant history and a major tourist attraction for Western New York," said Schumer. "These federal funds will go a long way in ensuring that this nearly two hundred-year-old ferry service will continue its rich tradition of crossing Lake Chautauqua for years to come."

"This is great news for Chautauqua County. The Bemus Point-Stow Ferry has been crossing Lake Chautauqua for nearly two centuries, and this investment will support critical improvements so that the ferry remains one of New York's historical treasures," said Clinton.

"This is yet another example of our federal elected officials helping Chautauqua County preserve one of our local treasures. The Bemus Point-Stow Ferry has been in continuous operation since 1811 and as such it has significant historical value to our region," said Chautauqua County Executive Greg Edwards. "I am delighted that these grant dollars can be invested in preserving one of the few inland ferries operating in all of the Eastern U.S. We will be upgrading the landings and bulkheads on both sides of the lake, to improve the access to and operation of the Ferry. I cannot thank our elected officials enough for their support especially Senators Schumer and Clinton and Congressman Higgins, who invested considerable time in this effort."

The Bemus Point-Stow Ferry will receive a grant of $429,033 for the rehabilitation of ferry terminal facilities.



For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Is Chautauqua Lake A Healthy Fishery?



It's been some time since we discussed the health of Chautauqua Lake and its affect on the residents of Chautauqua County.

OK, that may be a big statement, but let me explain.

Let's look at the facts: Chautauqua Lake is a 13,100-acre natural lake in Western New York. There are many who think that Chautauqua Lake is part of the infamous Finger Lake chain. A look at any map would lead one to believe that this statement would have to be true, but what is true is Chautauqua Lake was formed by glaciers thousands of years ago, give or take a few hundred years. As with most glacier lakes, Chautauqua Lake is deeper in the northern basin and shallower in the southern basin.

The origin of the name of our lake has been debated for years, but it's generally accepted that Chautauqua is an native Indian word for bag tied in the middle.

Whatever the origin of the name, all one has to do is mention the word Chautauqua to most folks within 150 miles of our county and it will bring a response. For some it means education, music or entertainment as in Chautauqua Institution. For others, the name Chautauqua brings thoughts of miles of vineyards and first-class wine. Some folks think of great fishing and water recreation when they hear the word Chautauqua.

No matter what one thinks about when they hear the word Chautauqua, it's based on water. The health of our fishery affects more then just sportsmen, but also all those who live in the county. It doesn't matter what business one is in, Chautauqua Lake is part of what makes our economy click.

For more years than I can remember, there has been heated debates about the health of Chautauqua Lake and it generally is based around vegetation growth on the lake. Over the years, thousands of hours have been spent debating the proper way to control vegetation. Plenty of money has been spent on studies and control methods.

Over the years, I have learned that when people are passionate about their beliefs, they will share their passion with others of the like mind. Now, once one or more gather in the name of a belief it becomes a news item and the passion grows. Without all the different interests of each segment of the population, the needs of the lake and its watershed would not be protected.

Recently there has been much discussed and written about the lack of weed growth so far this year on Chautauqua Lake. Some would like us to believe it has to do with a variety of past practices of vegetation control. Now, I have said many times I am not a biologist or expert on controlling water vegetation, but what I am a pretty good at is getting fish to bite a bait on Chautauqua Lake. I have learned that the lack of growth of vegetation on the lake has an impact on fishing.

I believe that many of the practices that we are using on Chautauqua Lake to control vegetation have had a positive effect on the weed growth in the lake. Between controlling the watershed, harvesting and the introduction of webbles and moths into the lake, they all have a positive impact on the lake and the fishery.

Chautauqua Lake is a complex body of water with many issues and just as many different users. Trying to balance all of the individuals that use the lake is difficult, and unfortunately, there is no model on how to be successful. One would think with all the lakes in the state, there would be another body of water and watershed that has gone through the same difficulties we are dealing with. Like many before us have said, there is no place like Chautauqua Lake and with that statement comes our own challenges.

Managing anything as complex as a lake is difficult, but, unlike some, I feel that the direction our lake is going is good.

I was told many years ago that a lake is like a business -it has its ups and downs. There will be good years and years when things aren't so good. Some feel that Chautauqua Lake should be like a huge swimming pool, but that's not healthy and its unrealistic.

There will be, for whatever reason, years when it seems that no matter where one goes on the lake there will be vegetation choking the life out of it. Then there are years when vegetation is under control and boaters, swimmers and anglers are all happy. For whatever reason, this year seems a good year for vegetation.

For anglers, this past weekend produced several muskies during the annual Muskie First catch-and-release tournament. Bass anglers have been enjoying good numbers and increased size this season.

While guiding this weekend and fishing a weed edge on the northern basin, my clients actually got into a nice school of crappie. That in itself is no big surprise, but the area where we got into the them was encouraging. Along with the number of crappie we caught, the quality was good for the time of year and water temperature.

For anglers who like to catch over weedbeds, there are dozens of areas on the lake where the tops of weeds are below the surface of the water. Casting topwater baits and shallow-running lures and working them over the tops of the weeds is a great way to pick everything from bass to muskie to pan fish.

Another plus is boaters are having no problems with their motors getting weeded up.

So far, this season has been a great one for all the users of the lake and only time will tell how the remainder of the season will be, but that's the exciting thing about having a lake in our backyard to enjoy.

Understanding the basic facts of any large natural body of water also mean understanding that often times there is little we can do to totally control any body of water.

 

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

 

 

Friday, June 27, 2008

Chautauqua Lake Bemus Bay Condominiums


 

New boat docks have been installed in Chautauqua Lake as part of the Bemus Bay condominium project. Half of the 40-home condos have been sold. Construction is expected to be completed by mid-summer.

BEMUS POINT - New boat docks have been installed in Chautauqua Lake's waterfront where the Bemus Bay condominium project nears completion.

"We are making great progress with both construction and home sales," said Lee Chilcote, co-developer at Bemus Point Investments LLC.

 

Nearly half of the 40 homes that will grace the Bemus Point shoreline were pre-sold by the end of last year and sales of the remaining homes are expected to be brisk leading up to and when the Chautauqua Institution season begins later this month.

Co-developer Paul Goldberg said the construction project is nearing 80 percent completion.

"The contractors are finishing the exterior facade work, the swimming and spa pools have been constructed, and the driveways and sidewalks will soon be paved," he said.

The new boat docks - each homeowner gets one along with a garage and an outdoor parking space - have received praise.

"They (the new docks) are really nice. They look so fresh," said a passerby while a jounalist was taking photos for this story. "They are a very attractive addition to the Bemus Point waterfront."

 

The two condominium buildings being constructed on Lakeview Avenue in the village, named Browning and Columbia for the hotels of the same names that stood on the site in the early 1900s, each host 20 homes. All homes have stunning views of Chautauqua Lake.

Located just 1+ hours from Buffalo, 2+ hours from Cleveland, 2+ hours from Pittsburgh and 3 hours from Toronto, Chilcote noted the Chautauqua Lake region offers relaxation and recreation year around with boating and sailing, fishing and hunting, golf courses, several winter ski resorts, a casino, many farm wineries and a wide array of cultural events and attractions all nearby.

 

The world-renowned Chautauqua Institution is just a short trip away by car or boat.

Each of the homes at Bemus Bay, www.bemusbaycondos.com, include one of the boat slips, secured building entry, handicapped access, elevator service, a garage and a reserved parking space.

 

Four different floor plans with three bedrooms and two or three baths include air conditioning, granite countertops, master suites with whirlpool baths and easy access to the courtyards heated swimming pool.



For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Thursday, June 26, 2008

Ellicottville’s July 4th Celebration



Summer Festival of the Arts & Championship Rodeo Next Weekend


BY JEANINE ZIMMER


Next weekend, Ellicottville will celebrate the long awaited summer season with the Summer Festival of the Arts, July 3-6; a homecoming of sorts for this four-season resort. Although most homecomings nationally are celebrated in the fall, for this resort town, you'll never catch us waiting around for any one season to come. After the winter thaw, we're ready to jump right back into the fun with an amazing splash!

The weekend begins with the kick-off of Ellicottville's Gazebo Series 2008, featuring the oldies and variety music of The Roadrunners. Sponsored by the Chamber and free to the community, this live entertainment series will take place each Thursday from July 3-Aug. 7 at the Village Gazebo from 7-9pm. Each performance invites the public to bring out the lawn chairs, blankets, family and friends, and enjoy some great live outdoor music.

On Friday, the Village Gazebo will also play host to a County Bicentennial Celebration as the Historical Society hosts a day of old-time activities. There will be demonstrations of basket weaving, spinning and candle making as well as some make-and-take activities for the children and displays of toys from yesteryears. There will also be lawn bowling, a watermelon seed spitting contest, a pie baking contest and a fiddlers contest with prizes! (The Fiddlers contest will be held from noon

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit:



Chautauqua Lake Yacht Club E Scow Championships

National E Scow Championships Begin Friday At CLYC

 
From left, Donna Schoor, Lindsey Puccio and Don Schoor from Wisconsin are preparing their boat for the upcoming NCESA National Championship event to be held at the Chautauqua Lake Yacht Club in Lakewood. The event is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year at C.L.Y.C.
P-J photo by Simon Teska
LAKEWOOD - The 50th annual National Class E Scow Association Championships will be held at the Chautauqua Lake Yacht Club Friday through Sunday.

Fifteen committees of CLYC members have been planning the event for more than 15 months.

 

The first-ever event was held in 1959 at the CLYC and it returns about every five years.

This year's event will involve top sailors from more than 21 clubs from nine states and Canada. In all, there will be about 270 competitors on 68 to 70 E Scows and12 are competing out of the CLYC.

 

Skippers will range in age from 19 to 83 and Sam Rogers from Minnetonka Yacht Club in Minnetonka, Minn., will be defending his title won last year at the Carolina Yacht Club in Charleston, S.C.

 

Participants started to arrive last weekend for the first leg of the New York State Championships held on Saturday and Sunday with 17 sailboats competing. George Welch of Keuka Yacht Club won the event while Rick Turner of CLYC was second and Marcus Turner of CLYC third.

 

Rick Turner is the commodore of the NCESA and is in the first of a two-year term.

Local principal race officers for this week's event are Bruce Erickson and Chip Ulrich of Lakewood. Ulrich is a former commodore of the NCESA from1985-87.

Assisting them as the race committee chairman is Geoff Turner of Ashville.

 

Beginning Friday, six races will be held over the course of the three days with no more than three races in any one day. The race course will consist of windward-leeward legs, typically 2 laps.

Each lap is approximately 1 to 2 miles, depending on wind conditions. The length of each race is approximately 60-75 minutes.

 

The action will start every day, depending on weather conditions, with a 10 a.m. harbor gun and the first race of the day starts at 11a.m.

The majority of the participants from outside the area will arrive today and there will be a competitors briefing at 7:30 p.m.

 

On Saturday evening will be the NCESA's annual banquet .

Also on Saturday, there will be a fireworks display performed by Zambelli. The public is invited to view the fireworks from the Lakewood Beach or other locations around the lake. The fireworks display should start at 9:30 p.m. or shortly thereafter.

Trophies will be presented upon conclusion of the regatta on Sunday afternoon to the skipper and crew of the top 10 boats. In addition, there will be trophies for the top three first time competitors, top rookie skipper, top women skipper and top masters skipper.

Later this summer, Aug 8-11, the CLYC is will host the Club 420 North American Championships

Chautauqua Institution Music


Hang 10 with Switchfoot
Music is vital to the San Diego alternative-rock band, but so too is surfing.

BY BRYAN OBERLE
bryan.oberle@timesnews.com [more details]



Published: June 26. 2008 6:00AM


Switchfoot: An energetic show by a band that relishes being on stage. (Contributed photo)

Zoom | Buy this photo


When you Google "Switchfoot," more than 4 million hits are recorded. That seems like an impressive number for this accomplished San Diego alternative-rock band.

That number is also somewhat deceiving. Switchfoot is also a popular surfing term. Which makes sense, considering Switchfoot band members remain deeply immersed in San Diego's iconic surfing lifestyle.



"Surfing has contributed heavily to what we are as a rock band," said Tim Foreman, bassist and younger brother of Switchfoot vocalist and songwriter, Jon Foreman. "Surfing culture is all about a cool, relaxed lifestyle. That has influenced our music and our approach to how we grow as a band."

Switchfoot's career roller coaster has raced from an early flirtation with Christian rock to near stardom after the band's 2003 major-label debut album, "The Beautiful Letdown," sold more than 2.6 million copies.

If it's possible for a rock band to remain relatively unknown after a double-platinum seller, Switchfoot has managed the trick. Which is hard to fathom since the band made its mainstream mark in a 2002 Mandy Moore movie vehicle, "A Walk to Remember."

That film featured four Switchfoot songs, including Moore singing the band's "Only Hope," plus a duet with Jon Foreman on the soundtrack.

Now the band has recorded a new song, "This Is Home," for the film, "The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian." The song is included on the film's soundtrack and was released to radio stations in April.



Yet Switchfoot remains the sort of near-anonymous band that even if you never heard of them, it's a safe bet that tunes like "Meant to Live" and "Dare You to Move" will jolt the memory bank when you hear them.

Foreman, who Internet encyclopedia Wikipedia reports graduated from San Dieguito Academy in 1997 with the title of "scholar athlete" for his high achievements in surfing and education, previewed Friday's Chautauqua Institution show.

Surfing has definitely influenced our approach to performing," said Foreman, who sounded like a surfer during a telephone interview. "We approach every night's show as a new experience and simply embrace what happens. If my bass goes dead, is that a good or a bad thing? I don't know. We'll have to see."

What you're likely to see Friday is an energetic show by a band that relishes being on stage. Besides the Foreman brothers, drummer Chad Butler and guitarists Jerome Fontamillas and Drew Shirley are at heart southern California surfers who just want to have fun.



The Switchfoot sound should ring a bell. Listening to the band's most recent album, "Oh! Gravity," a steady melodic sound is pushed along by hard-hitting guitar riffs. The album earned solid reviews and entered the Billboard charts in the Top 20.

But you get the feeling from Foreman that critical and commercial success is basically gravy for five guys who really don't care to leave San Diego's beaches all that often.

"Having 'rock musician' as your occupation is just ridiculous. Think about it," Foreman said. "We like to get out of San Diego and experience different things. But we all love what we do and understand how lucky we are."

Let's see: Surfing, San Diego, rock musicians. That's pretty sweet. And that's Switchfoot.


The skinny
Switchfoot will appear Friday at 8:15 p.m. at the Chautauqua Institution's Amphitheater in Chautauqua, N.Y. Tickets are $37 and are available at the box office, (716) 357-6250, Mon.-Fri. from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and online at www.ciweb.org.

 

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com




Thursday, June 19, 2008

Discount tickets to Chautauqua County Fair go on sale today


Discounted, advance price tickets for the 2008 Chautauqua County Fair go on sale today at many area retail outlets. The 127th edition of the fair runs July 21-27 at the fairgrounds in Dunkirk.

In addition to the Fair's traditional offering of midway rides, 4-H animal shows, demolition derbies and "fair food," this year's fair offers two concerts at the Budweiser Grandstand.

Terry Buchwald will perform his "Elvis" impersonation on Thursday night and former Statler Brothers vocalist, Jimmy Fortune, will be on stage on Saturday night. In the event of inclement weather, the concerts will be held under the canopy at the Arthur R. Maytum Family Theater.

Advance sale ticket prices are $6 each and allow fairgoers unlimited mechanical midway rides and entry to all Arthur R. Maytum Family Theater and Budweiser Grandstand shows except reserved seating in the grandstand for the demolition derby competitions. Daily gate tickets are $8 per person Monday-Thursday and $9 Friday-Sunday of fairweek. Senior citizens get 50% off their tickets every day of the fair.

"We're looking forward to another great Chautauqua County Fair," said Chautauqua County Agricultural and Fair Association president James Tytka Sr. "Our agricultural entries continue to grow and, by adding the concerts, we have diversified the entertainment at the Budweiser Grandstand. As always, there will be something for everyone to enjoy at this year's fair."

Combination advance sale and reserved demolition derby seating tickets are available only at the fair office, accessible off Waldorf Road in Dunkirk. The combination ticket prices are $11 for lower grandstand seating and $8 for the upper grandstand.

"The Fair Board, again this year, decided against raising our admission ticket prices," Tytka said. "We want people to come to the fair, which is very affordable compared to a lot of other entertainment venues, and experience the food, farming and fun."

General admission advance sale tickets are available at the following locations:

ASHVILLE - Ashville General Store, Lake County Dairy; CASSADAGA - Cassadaga Shurfine; CHERRY CREEK - Crossroads Grocery, Rodgers & Sons; CLYMER - Neckers Company; DUNKIRK - The Book Nook, First Ward Falcon Club, Flowers by Anthony, Kosciuszko Club, Matt's News, One Stop Food Mart, P&G Foods, Pizza Village, Quality Markets, Tops Friendly Markets, Tractor Supply Center, VFW John Murray Post; ELLINGTON - Country Corner Cafe; FALCONER - Lake County Dairy; FINDLEY LAKE - Findley Lake Hardware; FORESTVILLE - Cave's Food Center, Groll's Auto Service; FREDONIA - American Legion Post 59, Fredonia Food Mart, NAPA Auto Parts, Valone Ford; FREWSBURG - Quality Markets; GREENHURST - Lake County Dairy; IRVING - Stagecoach West; JAMESTOWN - Brigotta's, Cummins Engine Plant, Frank Bratt Agricultual Center, Lake County Dairy, Peterson Farm, Quality Markets; Valeo Plant; LAKEWOOD - Lake County Dairy, Quality Markets, Tractor Supply Center; MAYVILLE - Lake County Dairy, Quality Markets; PANAMA - NYP Management, Neckers; RIPLEY - Meeder's Restaurant, Ripley Hardware; SILVER CREEK - NAPA Auto Parts, Green Frog, Quality Markets, Smith's True Value Hardware; SINCLAIRVILLE - Sinclairville Superette; WESTFIELD - Devlin Farm Supply; Lake County Dairy, Quality Markets; SHERMAN - Farmers Mill.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com


 

Sunday, June 15, 2008

Chautauqua Lake Mayville Bluegrass Festival

 

Members of the Ryan Holladay band perform at the Mayville Bluegrass Festival on Saturday.

MAYVILLE — The strains of banjo, guitar and mandolin once again graced Mayville's Lakeside Park as the Mayville Bluegrass Festival began Saturday.

Now in its seventh year, the festival welcomed an eclectic group of performers, from local groups to national names, old hands to young stars.

Bill Ward, festival organizer, said he was especially pleased to welcome teenage performers Ryan Holladay and Sierra Hull — billed as the ''Futures of Bluegrass'' — to the festival.

''We've been able to develop a relationship with some young folks,'' Ward said. ''It's been great to get to know them.''

Holladay, 16, has been playing bluegrass for the better part of his life. He says his father introduced him to the music, which he's loved ever since.

''I've spent my entire life playing bluegrass, and I haven't gotten tired of it,'' Holladay said.

The young performer has already released three albums. His latest, ''New Kid in Town,'' was released last year by Skaggs Family Records. He is also credited as being the youngest performer ever to play Nashville's Grand Ole Opry, having performed there at the age of five.

But despite his success, Holladay said his favorite thing about playing bluegrass is meeting other artists at festivals and concerts.

''I love everything about it,'' Holladay said. ''It's such a social thing. You can go up to anybody and they'll be real personable.''

Ms. Hull, 16, has been playing bluegrass for half her life. Like Holladay, she was introduced to the genre by her father.

''I had a dad who liked it, then I got hooked on it,'' she said. ''I've been doing it long enough that I have so many friends.''

Ms. Hull has performed at Carnegie Hall, the Grand Ole Opry and on the PBS All-Star Bluegrass Celebration. She also co-hosted an educational DVD with Holladay called ''Discover Bluegrass.''

The festival also welcomed local talent, including Matt Homan of The Haybalers. Homan was in the audience for the first five years of the festival, and this is his second year performing there. He said the festival inspired him to form a band.

''I used to sing bluegrass with my dad,'' Homan said. ''I always liked the music, and the festival reminded me how fun it is.''

At the other end of the spectrum, Jack Lawrence has been playing bluegrass professionally since 1970. Best known as Doc Watson's partner, this is Lawrence's second year playing the festival.

Lawrence said he's surprised to realize he's been in the business for almost 40 years.

''It seems like a long time, but it's really flown by,'' he said.

For Ward, the success of the festival is all about building relationships between artists and audience.

''A lot of the musicians and the crowd maintain relationships year after year,'' Ward said. ''People say it's nice here.''

The Bluegrass Festival continues today beginning at 11 a.m. at Mayville's Lakeside Park. The last performance is at 8 p.m.

 

Jamestown Post Journal

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Thursday, June 12, 2008

Mayville Bluegrass Festival


Following is the schedule for the seventh annual Mayville Bluegrass Festival, which takes place Saturday and Sunday in Lakeside Park in Mayville, N.Y.

Music lineup

Held on main stage unless otherwise indicated.



SATURDAY

11 a.m. Dirty Mountain Band

11:40 a.m. Old Dawg

12:20 p.m. Town Mountain



1 p.m. Ryan Holladay Band

1:50 p.m. Straight Drive

2:40 p.m. Digger Davis and Tombstone

3:30 p.m. Sierra Hull Band

4:20 p.m. Amanda Barton and Steve Johnson



5 p.m. Kati Penn Band

6 p.m. Jack Lawrence and Friends

7 p.m. David Peterson and 1946

8:30 p.m. Chris Hillman and Herb Pedersen with special guest Al Perkins

10 p.m. Jack Lawrence and Friends, the Haybalers. Webb's Captain Table



10 p.m. Dirty Mt. Band, Goodfellas. Lakeview Hotel's the Docks

10 p.m. David Peterson and 1946, Straight Drive. Chautauqua Suites

SUNDAY

Noon. Doug Yeomans and Mountain Run



12:40 p.m. The Goodfellas

1:20 p.m. Creek Bend

2 p.m. The Haybalers

2:40 p.m. Sierra Hull and Guests

3:40 p.m. Cory and Jerrod Walker



4:40 p.m. Straight Drive

5:40 p.m. Town Mountain

6:40 p.m. Audie Blaylock and Redline

8 p.m. John Cowan Band



Workshops

Held in workshop tent.

SATURDAY



4:30 p.m. Flatpick guitar with Jack Lawrence

4:30 p.m. Fingerstyle guitar with Jon Garon

SUNDAY

1 p.m. Nurturing young musical talent with Walker, Holladay, Davis families



3 p.m. Fiddle with Ron Feinberg

5 p.m. Banjo and fiddle with Cory and Jerrod Walker

Contests



Held in Lakeview Park pavilion.

SATURDAY

12:30 p.m. Mandolin preliminaries

2:30 p.m. Flatpick preliminaries



SUNDAY

2 p.m. Flatpick and mandolin finals

FESTIVAL NOTES



Tickets are $15 per day, available at the gate. Youths 15 and under are free.

Parking is $6 per day in a lot located across the street from the festival.

Picnic baskets are welcome, but no alcohol is permitted inside Lakeside Park. Food vendors will be on site with sausage, barbecue chicken, funnel cakes, hot dogs, and other items.

For the first time, the Chautauqua Belle steamboat will cruise Chautauqua Lake during the event. Rides are $15, $10 for children. Departure times are 11 a.m., 1 p.m., 3 p.m., and 5 p.m.

Admission is free to Saturday night club shows.



Lakeside Park includes a playground, and arts and crafts for children will be available.

For directions or more festival information, visit online at www.mayvillebluegrassfestival.com.


Source: Erie Times-News'

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Tuesday, June 10, 2008

Western New York Employment Outlook

The prospect of finding a job in Western New York in the coming months looks favorable according to the Manpower Employment Outlook Survey.

 

The Milwaukee-based employment services company forecasts steady hiring in the Buffalo/Niagara Falls market in the third quarter with 30 percent of companies asked saying they will add workers while 13 percent anticipate payroll reductions. Construction, finance/insurance/real estate and services are the sectors that will offer the most openings.

 

In the Jamestown area, Manpower Inc. forecasts a respectable hiring pace with 23 percent of companies in the Chautauqua County city expanding their labor force and just 3 percent saying they will cut back.

 

The Rochester job market, Manpower said, will be bullish as 43 percent of surveyed employers saying their companies will increase payroll compared to just 10 percent who will decrease jobs.

Nationally, 26 percent of the 14,000 employers asked said they will bulk up employment rosters while 10 percent figure to have fewer workers in the period from July through September.




Looking for a new home? Visit our website: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
C. Rick & Julia McMahon
Broker/partners
Real Estate Advantage Realty 
716-483-3300  or  484-2020

Saturday, June 07, 2008

Keep Cool While Enjoying Your Chautauqua Weekend

By Jessica Wasmund jwasmund@post-journal.com POSTED: June 7, 2008

The ribs will be sizzling this weekend in Celoron, but for the dozens of people hitting the streets for Gus Macker, it will be important to avoid the same fate.The National Weather Service is predicting the first heat wave across the northeast for Friday, just in time for Celoron's Rib Fest and the annual Jamestown 3-on-3 basketball tournament. The warm temperatures, which are expected to remain between the high 80s and low 90s, will last in the area for the duration of the weekend.Rick Slagle, Celoron code enforcement officer, is not overly concerned with the possibility of heat stroke at Rib Fest, which will be held for the first time in a park and not on the asphalt of Jamestown.''One big benefit we're going to have is a park loaded with shaded trees, so there will be plenty of shade for people to go and sit down,'' Slagle.Since the event will be held right on the shores of Chautauqua Lake, the breeze coming off the water should add some extra coolness to the air as well.''Most of the time there's a nice breeze coming off the lake — I think it might even end up being a good place to come and get away from the sun,'' he said.Meanwhile, for the athletes who will be taking to the streets this weekend, Vincent Horrigan, executive director of the American Red Cross, Chautauqua County Chapter, advises taking the competition as seriously as any athlete would in such warm conditions.''When the temperature starts to increase, along with the humidity, heat-related illnesses can be a real factor,'' Horrigan said.Heat cramps are one of the main dangers of sun overexposure. Horrigan advised doing light stretching to keep the body limber prior to taking part in any physical activity. If at any time muscle spasms occur, athletes should get out of the direct heat.''Stay hydrated, get a good night's rest beforehand and don't over-do it,'' he said. ''Since this is the first time when it's going to be really hot out, don't spend the whole day in the sun and get plenty of shady. You really have to respect the sun. One recommendation is to keep a cool, wet towel available, maybe in a cooler — you can wipe your face and neck with that to keep cool.''Lastly, workers at the Pine Junction in Findley Lake, which will be holding a benefit this weekend, thought ahead and already have shade provided for anyone coming in Saturday. A large canopy has been set up, as well as a circus tent and a donated tent from Jamestown Awning to keep those in attendance cool in the shade.For more information on Chautauqua lake Real Estate & Living visit: http://www.chautauqualakehomes.com/

By Jessica Wasmund jwasmund@post-journal.com

POSTED: June 7, 2008

The ribs will be sizzling this weekend in Celoron, but for the dozens of people hitting the streets for Gus Macker, it will be important to avoid the same fate.

The National Weather Service is predicting the first heat wave across the northeast for Friday, just in time for Celoron's Rib Fest and the annual Jamestown 3-on-3 basketball tournament. The warm temperatures, which are expected to remain between the high 80s and low 90s, will last in the area for the duration of the weekend.

Rick Slagle, Celoron code enforcement officer, is not overly concerned with the possibility of heat stroke at Rib Fest, which will be held for the first time in a park and not on the asphalt of Jamestown.

''One big benefit we're going to have is a park loaded with shaded trees, so there will be plenty of shade for people to go and sit down,'' Slagle.

Since the event will be held right on the shores of Chautauqua Lake, the breeze coming off the water should add some extra coolness to the air as well.

''Most of the time there's a nice breeze coming off the lake — I think it might even end up being a good place to come and get away from the sun,'' he said.

Meanwhile, for the athletes who will be taking to the streets this weekend, Vincent Horrigan, executive director of the American Red Cross, Chautauqua County Chapter, advises taking the competition as seriously as any athlete would in such warm conditions.

''When the temperature starts to increase, along with the humidity, heat-related illnesses can be a real factor,'' Horrigan said.

Heat cramps are one of the main dangers of sun overexposure. Horrigan advised doing light stretching to keep the body limber prior to taking part in any physical activity. If at any time muscle spasms occur, athletes should get out of the direct heat.

''Stay hydrated, get a good night's rest beforehand and don't over-do it,'' he said. ''Since this is the first time when it's going to be really hot out, don't spend the whole day in the sun and get plenty of shady. You really have to respect the sun. One recommendation is to keep a cool, wet towel available, maybe in a cooler — you can wipe your face and neck with that to keep cool.''

Lastly, workers at the Pine Junction in Findley Lake, which will be holding a benefit this weekend, thought ahead and already have shade provided for anyone coming in Saturday. A large canopy has been set up, as well as a circus tent and a donated tent from Jamestown Awning to keep those in attendance cool in the shade.

For more information on Chautauqua lake Real Estate & Living visit: http://www.chautauqualakehomes.com/

By Jessica Wasmund jwasmund@post-journal.com POSTED: June 7, 2008 The ribs will be sizzling this weekend in Celoron, but for the dozens of people hitting the streets for Gus Macker, it will be important to avoid the same fate.The National Weather Service is predicting the first heat wave across the northeast for Friday, just in time for Celoron's Rib Fest and the annual Jamestown 3-on-3 basketball tournament. The warm temperatures, which are expected to remain between the high 80s and low 90s, will last in the area for the duration of the weekend.Rick Slagle, Celoron code enforcement officer, is not overly concerned with the possibility of heat stroke at Rib Fest, which will be held for the first time in a park and not on the asphalt of Jamestown.''One big benefit we're going to have is a park loaded with shaded trees, so there will be plenty of shade for people to go and sit down,'' Slagle.Since the event will be held right on the shores of Chautauqua Lake, the breeze coming off the water should add some extra coolness to the air as well.''Most of the time there's a nice breeze coming off the lake — I think it might even end up being a good place to come and get away from the sun,'' he said.Meanwhile, for the athletes who will be taking to the streets this weekend, Vincent Horrigan, executive director of the American Red Cross, Chautauqua County Chapter, advises taking the competition as seriously as any athlete would in such warm conditions.''When the temperature starts to increase, along with the humidity, heat-related illnesses can be a real factor,'' Horrigan said.Heat cramps are one of the main dangers of sun overexposure. Horrigan advised doing light stretching to keep the body limber prior to taking part in any physical activity. If at any time muscle spasms occur, athletes should get out of the direct heat.''Stay hydrated, get a good night's rest beforehand and don't over-do it,'' he said. ''Since this is the first time when it's going to be really hot out, don't spend the whole day in the sun and get plenty of shady. You really have to respect the sun. One recommendation is to keep a cool, wet towel available, maybe in a cooler — you can wipe your face and neck with that to keep cool.''Lastly, workers at the Pine Junction in Findley Lake, which will be holding a benefit this weekend, thought ahead and already have shade provided for anyone coming in Saturday. A large canopy has been set up, as well as a circus tent and a donated tent from Jamestown Awning to keep those in attendance cool in the shade.

For more information on Chautauqua lake Real Estate & Living visit: http://www.chautauqualakehomes.com/



Thursday, June 05, 2008

The Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy

MAYVILLE — The Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy invites the public to attend a program entitled Landscaping and Maintaining your Yard and Home for Clean Waters from 8:30 to 11 a.m. on June 14 at the Chautauqua Suites Meeting and Expo Center in Mayville.

This workshop featuring Sharon Anderson, Cayuga Lake Watershed Steward, is the first in a series planned by the Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy in 2008.

Anderson's responsibilities for the Cayuga Watershed Network includes leading educational programs on streamside protection and erosion control drinking water wells, the Cayuga Lake Restoration and Protection Plan, and non-point source pollution. She will provide information to property owners on ways to manage their yards and grounds to protect water quality, and will also cover topics such as watershed, streamside and lakeshore landscaping, and how to maintain a lawn to minimize water pollution.

"In 2008, the Conservancy is focusing its educational efforts on empowering watershed landowners and residents with the tools necessary to make an impact to reduce nutrients and sediments contributed in the lake by their own properties," said John Jablonski III, Executive Director of Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy. "How we handle the water coming from our rooftops and driveway, how we landscape and fertilize our yards, and how we dispose of household wastes all can lead to clean or dirty water in our wells, streams and lakes. We invite you to come and learn what you can do to prevent water pollution and fight excessive algae and plant growth in our waterways."

The Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy is a local, member-supported, not-for-profit organization focused on land conservation, watershed education, and water pollution prevention with the mission to preserve and enhance the water quality, scenic beauty and ecological health of the lakes, streams and watersheds of the Chautauqua region.

The public is encouraged to attend the workshop. It is free for Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy members and only $6 for non-members. Space is limited, so reserve your spot by June 9.

To register, or for more information, please contact the Conservancy office at 664-2166 or info@chautauquawatershed.org.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: http://www.chautauqualakehomes.com/