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Friday, September 28, 2007

Home Sales 2007

Here's what happened regionally in the United States with existing-home sales:
  • Northeast: slipped 2 percent in August to an annual pace of 1 million, which is 5.7 percent below a year ago. Median price: $282,300, up 3.6 percent from August 2006.
  • South: eased by 2.7 percent to a level of 2.2 million in August, which is 12.7 percent lower than August 2006. Median price: $183,500, down 0.7 percent from a year ago.
  • Midwest: fell 5.2 percent to an annual rate of 1.28 million in August, and is 10.5 percent below a year ago. Median price: $177,100, up 3.1 percent from August 2006.
  • West: dropped 9.8 percent in August to a level of 1.01 million, and is 21.7 percent below August 2006. Median price: $332,300, which is 3.8 percent below a year ago.

— REALTOR® Magazine Online


Chautauqua Lake Erie Wine Trail

Between Silver Creek, NY & North East, PA
 
Three new wineries !  Nineteen participating !!
 
Holiday Wine Weekends 2007
You choose the weekend:  Nov. 3 & 4 or Nov. 10 & 12
 
Order tickets online:  chautauquawinetrail.com
For more information:         1/888/965-4800
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Pumpkinville In Great Valley, NY

The frost is not yet on the pumpkin, but Pumpkinville, which is said to be New York's oldest continuously operating pumpkin farm, is gearing up for its big season.
 
The 200-acre farm in Great Valley near Ellicottville in Chautauqua County will open on Sept. 15 and will function through Oct. 31 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
This year's special attraction at the expanded tourist attraction, which features food, a corn maze and pumpkin contest, is an operating and refurbished 1870s-era cider mill.
 
Pumpkinville, which began operations in the early 1960s, attracted 80,000 visitors during a six-week season in 2006, its owners said.
Copyright 2007 bizjournals.com
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit:www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Ellicottville

$81M complex proposed near Ellicottville

Business First of Buffalo - by James Fink Business First

An indoor water park and hotel is the centerpiece of an $81 million development proposal for a site near Ellicottville in Cattaraugus County.
Amherst-based Ross Wilson & Associates Inc., through its Great Valley Resort Development LLC affiliate, is proposing the project for Great Valley, south of Ellicott-ville. In addition to the waterpark and a 300-room hotel, the proposal includes a network of equestrian and exercise trails.
Once municipal approvals are secured and financing details are in place, the project could begin construction by early 2009 and be ready to welcome guests the following year.
"This is something we have needed for a long time," said Brian McFadden, Ellicottville Chamber of Commerce executive director. "Conceptually, we love the project. It is a great plan and we have every reason to believe they'd be great neighbors."
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Tuesday, September 25, 2007

Busti Aplle Festival Chautauqua County, NY

Busti Apple Festival

Sunday, September 30 2007 11 AM - 5 PM
 
Location: Busti Historical Society
Grounds Mill Street
Busti, NY
Phone:
716-483-0134
 
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Monday, September 24, 2007

Chautauqua County Events

Monday, September 24, 2007

An Evening of Chamber Synergy

Music audiences live for that moment when great works and fine interpreters come together, and it just clicks. When this happens, you never want the evening to end. That's what you can expect to experience with An Evening of Chamber Music.

On Friday, September 28, 2007, musicians from Brock's and SUNY Fredonia's Music faculty will take the stage at the Sean O'Sullivan Theatre at 7:30 p.m., for a memorable evening.

Performing an eclectic mix of contemporary pieces and classical works, this event will be highlighted by the Brahms Horn Trio performed with tuba. Each of the players — pianist Karin Di Bella, percussionist Devon Fornelli, trumpeter Tim White, tubaist Raymond Stewart, and violinist Maureen Yuen — commands a beautiful sound.

An Evening of Chamber Music will feature diverse works by composers such as Camille Saint-Saëns and John Phillip Sousa; The Golden Age of the Xylophone arranged by Eyles and Werle; and Daniel Grabois' Zen Monkey, a recent composition for solo tuba.

Brian Power, Chair of the Department of Music feels, "this group's combination of superb musicianship and finely honed collaborative skills creates a seamless performance."

For an evening of engaging music, join us on Friday, September 28, 2007 at 7:30 p.m. at the Sean O'Sullivan Theatre. Tickets are $28.50 adults; $22.50 students/seniors, and are available at the Centre for the Arts Box Office, 905-688-5550, ext. 3257.

Visit the Department of Music website www.brocku.ca music for all Music events and locations.

The Department of Music is proud to be a partner of eyeGO to the Arts, encouraging high school students to attend live performing arts through an innovative $5 ticket program, visit http://www.arts.brocku.ca/eyego.php
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lkae Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com


 

Pumpkinville

Pumpkinville prepares for peak period

The frost is not yet on the pumpkin, but Pumpkinville, which is said to be New York's oldest continuously operating pumpkin farm, is gearing up for its big season.

The 200-acre farm in Great Valley near Ellicottville in Cattaraugus County will open on Sept. 15 and will function through Oct. 31 from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
 
 
This year's special attraction at the expanded tourist attraction, which features food, a corn maze and pumpkin contest, is an operating and refurbished 1870s-era cider mill.
 
Pumpkinville, which began operations in the early 1960s, attracted 80,000 visitors during a six-week season in 2006, its owners said.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Chautauqua County Event

A Tribute To Frank Sinatra Set
 Pictured are Joe Paterniti, Italian-American Charity Golf Association special events chairman, Betsy Wright, WCA Hospital president and chief executive officer, and Dennis Eshbaugh of Holiday Valley. WCA Hospital and Holiday Valley are the marquee sponsors for the event.
9/24/2007 - Italian-American Charity Golf Association Will Host A Performance By Impersonator

By The Post-Journal Staff

The Italian-American Charity Golf Association will host a performance by Tom Tiratto, a Frank Sinatra entertainer, at 8 p.m. Oct. 13 at the Reg Lenna Civic Center.

Tiratto is an actor and vocalist who has devoted the last 15 years to recreating the music and glamour of Sinatra. He has appeared at many of the finest venues in the United States and abroad. Sinatra's signature hits include ''I've Got You Under My Skin,'' ''New York New York,'' ''My Way,'' My Kind of Town,'' and others.

The Italian-American Charity Golf Association is a not-for-profit organization that has supported cancer research since its inception in 1971, primarily due to the success of its annual golf tournament. As the group continues to support cancer research, its early detection and treatments, organizers have found it necessary to look at additional ways of meeting the commitments pledged to different cancer related medical groups within the community.

''The Italian- American Charity Golf Association is very excited to offer a professional Vegas style show that Tom Tiratto provides to further these efforts,'' said John Calamunci, association chairman.

All proceeds from the ticket sales and sponsorship of the show will support the Italian-American Charity Golf Association's three-year, $150,000 pledge to the WCA Hospital Endoscopy Unit.

Tickets are on sale and can be purchased at the Reg Lenna Box Office or at various downtown businesses. Tickets are $20 for reserved seating and $15 for general admission. For more information, call 499-2705 or 499-5038 or the Reg Lenna Box Office.WCA Hospital and Holiday Valley are the marquee sponsors for the event, as is The Post-Journal.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com


 

Sunday, September 23, 2007

Chautauqua County Tourism

Tapping tourism
County has potential for world-class status By JESSICA WASMUND Special to the OBSERVER

 Photo by Jessica Wasmund

Roger Brooks, president of Destination Development, offered advice to Chautauqua County in a seminar Thursday about how to promote local tourism and better market the area.
9/22/2007 - On average, 42 million people a year subscribe to travel magazines. Each month vacationers travel to different parts of the globe, and Roger Brooks, president of Destination Development, believes that if Chautauqua County took the right steps it could be one of the most sought-after destinations in the world.

''There is no reason this area shouldn't be a year-round attraction,'' Brooks said.

In a lengthy seminar, Brooks gave a town-by-town assessment of the county, pointing out both positives and negatives he and his wife found along the way. Many of the areas had the same problems — not enough or too many signs, lacking curb appeal and other similar issues. Although he did not have time to touch on every jurisdiction in the county, he did make suggestions for a number of them (see sidebar).

''I think he gave us a lot to work with and we need to get going — a lot of his suggestions we were already aware of,'' said Bill Tuggle of the Dunkirk Chamber of Commerce. ''It always bothered me how store owners don't pick up in front of ther businesses — I'm a walker so that's something I see on a daily basis. However, it was nice to have an outsider come in and point out something as simple as the Chadwick Bay sign on both sides of the railway track. Since I've lived here for so long that's something I never picked up on.''

Brooks said the best way to increase the interest in tourism is to create primary diversions — what can visitors only get here. While New York state and particularly this region are renowned for their wine trails, how do they differ from wine trails across the Niagara and Finger Lakes region and other parts of the country. According to Brooks, there are a number of significant establishments in the area, everything from Valvo's in Silver Creek to the 1812 Fredonia Opera House to the Lucy-Desi Museum that while they might not outwardly attract people, they would pique their interest and convince them to stay longer.

''Studies show that 75 percent of people who stop at McDonald's to use the restrooms will purchase something – 50 percent on impulse, 25 percent ouf of guilt,'' Brooks said. ''If you can get people out of their cars, you have a four times greater chance of getting them to spend money.''

Participants in the seminar had a very positive reaction to the event, according to Andrew Nixon, executive director of the Chautauqua County Visitor's Bureau, one of the workshop's sponsors.

''We first brought Roger in back in March 2006 for a session at the Fredonia Opera House and those in attendance had a good response afterwards, asking when we could work together to supplement his ideas,'' Nixon said. ''He did just general assessment then, so we decided to bring him back now to do a full assessment of Chautauqua County. We are trying to determine how the market conceives Chautauqua as a destination, and what can specific communities do to improve this perception?''



Nixon said Brooks' name first came about as a referral after he was honored as the keynote speaker for Pennsylvania's Governor's tourism conference. The CCVB heard he was making presentations in Ontario and contacted him because he was considered to be the premier expert on tourism development.

''The people I've talked to keep wanting to know how we can further this process and how we can overcome and political or governmental obstacles,'' Nixon said. ''They want to implement his suggestions and work on this.''

Brooks actually started his career in the concert industry. At the time, some of his associates were developing a restaurant and after helping them, he was hooked and his career evolved from there. Currently, he has been in the business for 25 years.

''I love my job — tourism is the greatest industry on earth,'' Brooks said. ''It's all about people going out and having a good time.''

Brooks travels across the country working 300 days a year. He has visited everywhere from Maine to Texas all the way up to Adak, Alaska, a town of merely 100 people.

''Some places need more help with different markets, but it all comes down to finding a way of working together,'' Brooks said. ''Desert towns in the southwest have a little different mentality than places such like the northeast — they don't have the history, so in that sense it really differs, and that's where the most challenges come in.''

One of the most important aspects of enhancing a region's tourism according to Brooks is establish a brand.

''Your brand is a marketing tool — it's all about cash,'' Brooks said. ''The average person is exposed to 1,200 marketing messages a day. The days of generic marketing are over and you cannot be all things to all people.''

In order to be the most successful at branding, each town or city must find its niche, then push it. Always be very specific, do not use cliche's as town mottos and promote like crazy.

''Something for everyone and geography are not brands,'' Brooks said. ''They are ambiances. Brands revolve around experiences — a successful brand is always experimental and creates a feeling with the visitor.''
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Thursday, September 20, 2007

Chautauqua Lake

Bugs Help To Kill Weeds
By Dennis Phillips dphillips@post-journal.com

9/20/2007 - LAKEWOOD — Moths and weevils are the new allies for county residents working to destroy the invasive weed Eurasian milfoil in Chautauqua Lake.

On Wednesday, Bob Johnston, Cornell University professor, gave the Chautauqua Lake Association its 2006-07 lake report at the Bemus Point Casino. Johnston said Cornell is in its fifth year of a multi-year contract with the CLA analyzing the lake.

Johnston reported on Cornell's study of insect population on milfoil. The professor said aquatic moths and weevils were added to Burtis Bay in 2002 to see how it would effect the invasive weed. From 14 different stations, Cornell has discovered the insects are having a positive effect on milfoil.

''We have seen a lot of damage to milfoil,'' he said.

Johnston said Chautauqua Lake is a major part of Cornell's study on how herbivores — moths and weevils — effect milfoil.

''We're attempting to associate the density of herbivores with damage to water milfoil caused by herbivores,'' he said.

Johnston wasn't done describing items destroying the invasive weed that is damaging the water quality of Chautauqua Lake. He also said caddis flies are also destroying milfoil, even though there is not enough data at this time to find out how much damage is being done by the water insects.

Also, Johnston said blue green algae is also draining nutrients from weak milfoil that has been damaged by moths and weevils, which is also helping to kill the invasive weed.

Even with the positive news about insects destroying milfoil, Johnston stressed other areas residents can continue to work on to improve the quality of the lake.

''Continue to promote good watershed practices,'' he said. ''Also, limit erosion, nitrogen and phosphorus going into the lake.''

Johnston said next year the group will be studying native aquatic plants in the lake.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

Chautauqua County Events

Events
9/18/2007 - Free Herbal Hour , 1465 Foote Ave, Jamestown , Chautauqua County  Herbs R 4 U, Inc. hosts every Tuesday, a free Herbal Hour from 7 - 8 p.m. This Tuesday we will be discussing Vegetarianism. Every Tuesday is a different topic so stop by the store and get a schedule.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-484-0477. 300

9/19/2007 - Chad & Jeremy , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County   8 p.m. The famed 60s pop duo with hits including Yesterday's Gone, Summer Song and Willow Weep For Me, on tour for the first time in 30 years. One of the most successful of the British invasion acts, Chad Stuart & Jeremy Clyde still deliver the lush sound that made them folk pop royalty!  Cost is $22 , $20 Opera House members. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 80

9/19/2007 - Open House: Cosmetology & Massage Therapy , 940 Peach Street, Erie , Erie(a) County  4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Free chair massages, refreshments, and prize drawing. Call 1-800-775-4187 to pre-register.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.toniguy-erie.edu. 301

9/22/2007 - Special Bingo , Garland Fire Hall, Pittsfield , Warren County  Doors open at 7:00 p.m. Games start at 9:00 p.m. Winner Take All Game & Dual Dab Bingo Kitchen will be open with free drinks available.  Cost is $20.00 all you can play. , More Info. at: 814-563-7575. 343

9/22/2007 - Allegheny River Jam & Arts Festival , Breeze Point Landing, Warren , Warren County  Join local artists and musicians for a day of Fine Art, Fine Music and Fine Foods!  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 814-723-1360. 340

9/22/2007 - Harvest Roast Beef Dinner & Theme Basket Raffle , 4th Street & Washington Avenue, Dunkirk , Chautauqua County  St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church Annual Roast Beef Dinner and Theme Basket Raffle will be held Saturday, September 22, 2007 from 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. in the Parish Hall, 4th and Washington Ave. Dinner includes roast beef, mashed potatoes and gravy, squash, beets, carrots, cole slaw, sliced tomatoes, rolls and butter, homemade pies and beverages.  Cost is $8,00 for Adults, and $5.50 for Children. , More Info. at: 716-366-1750. 274

9/23/2007 - Folk in Fredonia Free-for-All , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  3 p.m. Fredonia Folk music favorites Dick & Carmen Gilman gather friends from throughout the state for a great afternoon of fun folk music and dance.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 81

9/23/2007 - Paws In The Park , Joseph DeFrees Pavilion - Betts Park, Warren , Warren County  Starts at 12:00 p.m. Planned activities are: A demonstration by Donna Anderson of the AKC's Canine Good Citizen Test followed by a brief Q&A session on dog behavior problems, Musical chairs for dogs and their owners, the Doggie Party Costume Parade, and the doggie scavenger hunt! Music provided by DJ Mark Christy. Blessing of the Animals by Father Ray Gramata.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.warrenhumanesociety.org. 280

9/28/2007 - 30th Annual Falling Leaves Festival , Veteran's Park; Broad Street, Salamanca , Cattaraugus County  Food, crafts, live entertainment, boxing, 5k run, Dueling Pianos, Lumberjack Show, and much more over the weekend event.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.SalamancaChamber.com. 179

9/29/2007 - Reggae Funk Soul Gumbo , 104 E. Second Street, Jamestown , Chautauqua County  On Saturday, September 29th at 10 p.m., Sleeping Giant and the Word of the Day make their Jamestown debut. Local legends SmackDab will be opening up for them. Get there early and stay late!  Cost is $3. , More Info. at: www.myspace.com/sleepinggiantrocks. 293

9/29/2007 - National Alpaca Farm Day , 5486 Twichell Road, West Valley, NY, Ashford , Cattaraugus County  Come join West Winds Alpaca Ranch for the National Alpaca Farm Day! See the alpacas and learn about these beautiful animals. Touch the exquisite alpaca fleece and see products made from alpaca fiber. From Springville, NY at the corner of Rtes. 39 & 240, go south on Rte. 240 for about 4 miles. Turn left onto Twichell Road and watch for the West Winds Alpaca Ranch sign.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.nationalalpacafarmday.com. 294

9/29/2007 - Run for Liberty 5K run/walk , Audubon center and Sanctuary 1600 Riverside Road, Kiantone , Chautauqua County  8:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.; The race is at 10:00 a.m.  Cost is $18 before Friday, September 21st, $20 after. , More Info. at: www.jamestownaudubon.org. 298

9/29/2007 - All Day Health Seminar , YWCA Lake Laodge - Westminster Presbyterian Church, Corner of Harlem and Terrace Aves, Lakewood , Chautauqua County  This all day affair will educate you on different health issues and natural ways of helping you heal yourself. It will cover nutritional deficiencies, our deadly fascination with junk food, how stressed America really is, traditional Chinese medicine and more. Don't miss this fun-filled, health educational day, which includes booklets, CDs and a healthy lunch. Call Herbs R 4 U, Inc. for more information.  Cost is $20.00. , More Info. at: 716-484-0477. 341

9/30/2007 - Busti Apple Festival , 3443 Lawson Rd, Busti , Chautauqua County  11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. There will be around 130 homemade craft vendors, demonstration of weaving, spinning, corn husk dolls and many others will be performed, farmers market, apple, peach, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, cherry and strawberry rhubarb pies, a variety of apples for sale, apple cider, candy apples and funnel cakes, country store with fresh baked goods, hot dogs, hamburgers, beef on wick, Kettle Corn. Busti Mill & Museum will be open.  Cost is $3.00 per person, children under 12 are free. , More Info. at: 716-483-3670. 277

9/30/2007 - Adam & Eve, Creationism or Genetic Engineering , Rt 60; 89 N. Main St., Cassadaga , Chautauqua County  Tom Beardshall, author of Steering Your Way Through Life, and owner operator of the Holistic Wellness Center in McMurray, PA has taught classes around the country for national and regional organizations. His talk on Sept. 30, at 1:30 p.m. at Universal Unity of Spirit will introduce some of the material that he is presently researching and compiling for his second book scheduled for publication late 2008. "What Shall I Do With Jesus" addresses the question that Pontius Pilate first asked and presents a new vision of Jesus based on research into original documents that date back to Jesus' time.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.universalunityofspirit.org. 342

10/12/2007 - Halloween Open House  , Warren , Warren County  Halloween Open House, trolley rides, Warren County Historical Society, 6:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.    332

10/13/2007 - Pork & Sauerkraut Dinner , 1111 Madison Ave, Warren , Warren County  Pork and sauerkraut dinner, First Church of God, 4 p.m. - 7 p.m.    333

10/13/2007 - Historical Museum Open House , One-Room School and Elk Township Historical Museum, Warren , Warren County  noon - 4 p.m.    335

10/13/2007 - Breast Cancer Outreach , 1640 Market St. Ext., Warren , Warren County  Celebration of Life Breast Cancer Outreach, information on early identification, testing, auction, photo sharing, gifts, brunch fare, music, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.; floral festival, 10 a.m.    334

10/13/2007 - Mayville Guitar Show and Stringed Instrument Festival , Celebration Hall (Old Mayville School Aud), Mayville , Chautauqua County  Featuring workshops, concerts, demos all weekend, as well as a Saturday Evening concert by Colorado singer/songwriter Chuck Pyle.  Cost is $15 for the weekend - day rates available.. , More Info. at: mayvilleevents.com. 295

10/14/2007 - Mayville Guitar Show and Stringed Instrument Festival  , Mayville , Chautauqua County  This October festival brings together the best western New York luthiers and dealers of fine instruments, weekend-long workshops and concerts.    314

10/18/2007 - The Sound Of Music , Library Theatre, Warren , Warren County  Warren Players presents "The Sound of Music," October 18th through the 20th, Library Theatre, 8 p.m. daily, 2 p.m. on October 20th.    , More Info. at: 814-723-7231. 336

10/20/2007 - The Ying Quartet , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  8 p.m. The quartet-in-residence at the Eastman School of Music, the Ying siblings have been performing together for nearly 15 years and are one of the nation's most sought-after string quartets.  Cost is $15 , $12 Opera House members, $10 students. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 82

10/20/2007 - Farmer's Market , Moore Park, Routes 394 and 20, Westfield , Chautauqua County  8 a.m. to 1 p.m.    316

10/20/2007 - Cross Roads Country Craft Market  , Westfield , Chautauqua County  9 a.m. to 5 p.m.    , More Info. at: 716-326-6278. 319
 
 



Friday, September 14, 2007

Chautauqua County NY Real Estate

National Trends Allude Jamestown
By Jessica Wasmund jwasmund@post-journal.com

 ''Our market is stable and it's the lake-front properties and second-home buyers that help keep the area up on real estate.'' • Richard Benedetto, Real Estate Advantage
9/14/2007 - While real estate offices across the country are facing the worst housing slump in nearly 16 years, the Jamestown region reflects none of the slumping housing sales.

''As far as national trends, our area is not like the national trends only because our appreciation here is so low that when you get a recession it doesn't really affect our market a lot,'' said Richard Benedetto of Real Estate Advantage. ''Our market is stable and it's the lake-front properties and second-home buyers that help keep the area up on real estate.''

Statistics from the Chautauqua County Board of Realtors show that most houses take about 60 days to close – four to five weeks for financing and three to five weeks to close. The numbers vary whether the house is a cash purchase or paid for through financing.

''Locally, as compared to a year ago, we've actually increased 29 percent in the number of single family sales,'' said Jan Murray, executive officer of the Chautauqua County Board of Realtors. ''In terms of sale prices, we've actually increased a tenth of a percent from $69,950 to $70,000.''

On a national level, comparing home sales between July 2006 and July 2007, there was a 9 percent decrease, and the price decreased by a sixth of a percent overall.

''The figures you see on a national level you will never see here because of our economy,'' Benedetto said. ''But as far as residential properties go, if we see a change of 2 or 3 percent a year there's really not much farther down we can go because our market has always been so conservative.''

In the past year, Jamestown has had a total of 346 closings on single-family homes. Lakewood, Falconer and Celoron had 54, 26 and 9 closings, respectively. The average cost was $68,764.49, while the average for Chautauqua County as a whole was $109,526.11.

''Right now we have a very active real estate market,'' said Tom Turner, owner of Century 21 in Lakewood. ''Other than some pockets here and there across the country we are doing as well as any other market. Nationally, real estate has gone down overall as a whole, but we're in an area where it's never been that great, but it's never been that bad, either.''

For those trying to sell their home, the market shows a much more favorable comparison to other parts of the country such as Santa Ana, California, where statistics show houses could be on the market for up to four years.

''Overall in the county, houses remained on the market for 119 days in 2006, and showed only a slight increase for 2007 with an average of 133 days on the market,'' Ms. Murray said.
 
For more information on Chautauqua County Real Estate or Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Thursday, September 13, 2007

Chautauqua Region New York Tourism

How Businesses Survive When Tourists Leave
By Jessica Wasmund

 The End Of The Summer

According to Webb's owner Jim Webb, the company often struggles during winter months due to excessive losses. P-J photo by Jessica Wasmund
9/13/2007 - As summer begins to wind down in the Chautauqua region, so do the number of tourists.

The thousands who flock here each summer are retreating to their winter homes and seasonally-operated stores and restaurants are closing up shop again until May.

In an area that relies so heavily on the tourism industry, it can sometimes be difficult running a business when there are so many determining factors, such as weather and gas prices.

However, because many of the shops and restaurants in the area have been in operation for so long, a summer-only schedule is second nature.

''During the winter months we get everything set up, try and come up with new and innovative ideas, and put everything together for the upcoming pops season,'' said Deanna Scott, general manager of the Italian Fisherman in Bemus Point. ''During the winter we keep on just our management crew, and during the summer we never have problems getting new staff because we hire such a variety of ages — everyone from school teachers to college and high school students. Having the break in between seasons seems to be a way of getting away from burnout.''

According to Scott, the eatery has no problems keeping up with its budget. Most of the clientele are vacationers who are interested in relaxing, so she believes there is a significant difference than opposed to year-round places.

Peter Wiener, owner of We Wan Chu Cottages in Mayville, uses his winter months to do marketing and promotion in close cities such as Cleveland, Buffalo and Pittsburgh.

''We want to create We Wan Chu as a travel destination, and we also spend our winter months doing renovations on the cabins,'' Wiener said. ''We find it's the only possible to be profitable by being open half the year — obviously we get a lot of snow and it's a liability to have people slipping on ice. I'm sure if it was profitable the business would be open year round — our family has owned We Wan Chu for 28 years now, so we've got the business figured out.''

Mike Sullivan, director of institution relations and public affairs at Chautauqua Institution, says that having a longer season than nine weeks would be difficult because the summer programs take nine months to plan.

See SURVIVING On Page A-3

To have that intense a program for longer would not be cost effective, he said.

One place that opts to remain open year-round is Webb's in Mayville, which has been family-owned for 65 years. Owner Jim Webb says that his strategy for operations is to keep bringing back people who might only go to Webbs once every five or 10 years by exceeding their expectations.

''We do incur some loss in the winter, in terms of cash flow, we keep staff on all year and don't generate nearly as much income as do May through October,'' Webb said. ''This area is a second home area, and a great deal of our business is with the second home owner who only uses their residence during a six-month period. There are some people who come for skiing or snowmobiling, but I'd say we only get about 25 percent of the business as we do in the summer.''

While Webb's may see some loss, Andrew Nixon, executive director of the Chautauqua County Visitor's Bureau feels that each operation varies on a case to case basis.

''Typically your bigger attractions and shops will get tourists as well as locals,'' Nixon said. ''But if you are a new business looking to come in, you have to be open year round. If you're just renting out a few cottages as a secondary income, you're gonna make what you make and your costs will be down in the winter. We often find people in this situation have multiple businesses to ensure they make enough money to get by.''

Craig Colburn, general manager of the new Chautauqua Suites, Meeting & Expo Center in Mayville hopes that the hotel will be able to help drive up the off-season, because nothing similar has ever been built before. Henery K. ''Van'' McConnon, Colburn's superior, made that a priority years ago.

''Van's number one goal is to expand the season, so it's our number one goal,'' Colburn said. ''With the expansion of the season by utilizing the convention center, we could essentially help our competitors, area shops and other locals see more business. Now the million dollar question is how?''

Colburn feels that the center is unique in the sense that it will be able to do more, larger events year-round. Place that might never have considered Chautauqua Lake as a possibility would now have a place to hold large, main-stream events.

Another method McConnon and Colburn hope to utilize is a culinary school run by Food Is Good Inc. that is working in conjunction with JCC.

''We're hoping to tap into winter dining programs — it's fun, because these chefs kind of become rock stars to people who take classes with them,'' Colburn said. ''They'll take a class, then go out to eat and want to see the chef because they've worked with them and know how amazing they are at what they do.''

Colburn intends on setting up package deals to combine the class with stays at the center to draw in people.

''Often times a great vacation isn't just an experience, but when you leave with a story,'' Colburn said. ''You can be shuttled to the golf course, or you can be ferried over by the Chautauqua Belle and given complimentary snacks on the ride, and have your golf cars waiting for you with keys in the ignition – that's a story.''

The goal for Colburn is to raise the economic business climate for the entire area. Presently there is a large number of people in the ice-fishing community, but many are locals. However, a great number of snowmobilers will travel from out of state, but much of that population relies on the weather.

''Everyone is looking for a magic solution as to how to grow the off-season, and it's much more difficult than just a couple quick ideas it instead requires several activities,'' Colburn said. ''Peak'n'Peek has created larger-scale events and our next step should be to take a cue from them. People have lots of secondary homes out here, but there's nothing to do. If we can open up the restaurants, offer art exhibits, give tours — they'll come.''
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Tuesday, September 11, 2007

Chautauqua Lake

Town Board To Work With Hotel Developer
By Nicholas Dean ndean@post-journal.com

 ''We're looking at what alternatives there are.'' <= Rex Tolman, Tolman Engineering
9/11/2007 - STOW — North Harmony officials have taken the first step toward providing town residents with water and sewer services.

During a regular business meeting Monday, the Town Board voted to spend up to $15,000 on a feasibility study which will investigate the possibility of extending water and sewer lines along Route 394.

''We're looking at what alternatives there are,'' said Rex Tolman of Tolman Engineering, the town's engineering firm. ''The basic idea is just to summarize what environmental problems we might have, look at the alternatives and cost amounts so you can make an intelligent decision on what direction is the best way to bring in water and sewer.''

Long thought to be too costly an endeavor for the town to undertake, the extension of water and sewer lines recently became a possibility due to the involvement of John McGraw — the developer looking to build a Doubletree Hotel in Stow. Because the prospective eight-story hotel will require sewer and water, McGraw approached the Town Board and Chautauqua County Industrial Development Agency about jointly paying for installing the lines along Route 394.

According to Bill Daly, IDA director, the IDA would draft an agreement to have the county or town bond for the project and then have the private user, in this case the hotel developer, pay a percentage of the cost back over time.

If it is found to be possible, a single-user water district would be created and a sewer line would be extended from Ashville Bay to Bootey Bay where McGraw is looking to build the hotel. Once the line is extended to the hotel, sewer districts would be created along Route 394 to bring sewer services to the residences between the road and Chautauqua Lake. And once sewer lines are established, it's said water lines could subsequently be added.

Estimated at costing more than $3 million if undertaken by the town alone, the project has been called impossible to do without the help of other agencies.

''It's amazing,'' said Sally Carlson, town supervisor, during Monday's meeting. ''It's something that many of us who have been involved in government here had no idea was even a possibility.''

In the resolution authorizing the town to fund the feasibility study, the project was described as an enhancement of the health and welfare of town residents. Additionally, if the feasibility exceeds $15,000, McGraw will pay for the additional cost.

According to town officials, having water and sewer services could make the town more appealing to other developers.

''Once you get the infrastructure in, that opens a lot of doors for possible development,''
Town Board To Work With Hotel Developer
By Nicholas Dean ndean@post-journal.com

 ''We're looking at what alternatives there are.'' <= Rex Tolman, Tolman Engineering
9/11/2007 - STOW — North Harmony officials have taken the first step toward providing town residents with water and sewer services.

During a regular business meeting Monday, the Town Board voted to spend up to $15,000 on a feasibility study which will investigate the possibility of extending water and sewer lines along Route 394.

''We're looking at what alternatives there are,'' said Rex Tolman of Tolman Engineering, the town's engineering firm. ''The basic idea is just to summarize what environmental problems we might have, look at the alternatives and cost amounts so you can make an intelligent decision on what direction is the best way to bring in water and sewer.''

Long thought to be too costly an endeavor for the town to undertake, the extension of water and sewer lines recently became a possibility due to the involvement of John McGraw — the developer looking to build a Doubletree Hotel in Stow. Because the prospective eight-story hotel will require sewer and water, McGraw approached the Town Board and Chautauqua County Industrial Development Agency about jointly paying for installing the lines along Route 394.

According to Bill Daly, IDA director, the IDA would draft an agreement to have the county or town bond for the project and then have the private user, in this case the hotel developer, pay a percentage of the cost back over time.

If it is found to be possible, a single-user water district would be created and a sewer line would be extended from Ashville Bay to Bootey Bay where McGraw is looking to build the hotel. Once the line is extended to the hotel, sewer districts would be created along Route 394 to bring sewer services to the residences between the road and Chautauqua Lake. And once sewer lines are established, it's said water lines could subsequently be added.

Estimated at costing more than $3 million if undertaken by the town alone, the project has been called impossible to do without the help of other agencies.

''It's amazing,'' said Sally Carlson, town supervisor, during Monday's meeting. ''It's something that many of us who have been involved in government here had no idea was even a possibility.''

In the resolution authorizing the town to fund the feasibility study, the project was described as an enhancement of the health and welfare of town residents. Additionally, if the feasibility exceeds $15,000, McGraw will pay for the additional cost.

According to town officials, having water and sewer services could make the town more appealing to other developers.

''Once you get the infrastructure in, that opens a lot of doors for possible development,'' Mrs. Carlson said. ''There are so many possibilities once you have water and sewer, possibilities that you don't have when you're talking about a private septic system. Once you're talking about a municipal system, it's a whole new ball game.''

Citing specific examples, Mrs. Carlson said the town has lost development in recent years because the town does not have sewer and water service.

Proposed to the town more than a year and a half ago, the hotel project has already been met with opposition from some North Harmony residents. However, with the recent news that a hotel could mean extending water and sewer to the area, residents will now be faced with the question of whether to accept the hotel for the benefits it could provide. According to Mrs. Carlson, everyone will have their chance to weigh in on the topic during future public meetings and hearings.
Mrs. Carlson said. ''There are so many possibilities once you have water and sewer, possibilities that you don't have when you're talking about a private septic system. Once you're talking about a municipal system, it's a whole new ball game.''

Citing specific examples, Mrs. Carlson said the town has lost development in recent years because the town does not have sewer and water service.

Proposed to the town more than a year and a half ago, the hotel project has already been met with opposition from some North Harmony residents. However, with the recent news that a hotel could mean extending water and sewer to the area, residents will now be faced with the question of whether to accept the hotel for the benefits it could provide. According to Mrs. Carlson, everyone will have their chance to weigh in on the topic during future public meetings and hearings.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Monday, September 10, 2007

Holliday Valley Ranked # 5 in the East

Sunday, September 9, 2007

SKI Magazine Releases Highly-Anticipated 2008 'Top 50 Resort Guide'



The Ultimate Ski Vacation Planner Places Deer Valley Resort in Top Spot

BOULDER, Colo., Sept. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- SKI Magazine's annual "Top 50
Resort Guide," the definitive ranking of North American ski resorts, names
Deer Valley, Utah as the No. 1 ski resort in its October issue, on
newsstands September 25. Deer Valley returns to the top spot after being
ranked second in last year's survey. Perennial favorite Tremblant, Que. is
again ranked No. 1 on the East Coast, a tribute to consistent standards of
excellence.
Luxury favorite Deer Valley, Utah, captured the top spot for the third
time in the survey's 20-year history. Much lauded by SKI readers for its
topnotch service, grooming and dining, Deer Valley received top ten
finishes in 11 of the 18 categories ranked. Deer Valley was also voted the
best spot for a Luxury Ski Trip in the lifestyle rankings. Utah resorts
heavily dominated the lifestyle rankings with Snowbird, Utah being voted
the Best Skier's Mountain and Alta, Utah coming in as the best Weekend
Escape.
"SKI readers are an astute, not to mention well-traveled, bunch and
their consensus is convincing," says SKI Magazine's executive editor Greg
Ditrinco. "You'd do well to consider them advance scouts as you plan this
year's ski vacation. They won't let you down."
On the overall rankings Vail, Colo., came in at No. 2, leading a group
of six Colorado resorts in the top ten, more then any other state. Whistler
Blackcomb, B.C., moved up one spot to No. 3 on the list. Tony Aspen, Colo.,
saw the largest increase of any of the resorts in the top ten, moving up
three spots to No. 4 with sister resort Snowmass, Colo., coming in at No.
5. Beaver Creek, Colo., Steamboat, Colo. and Sun Valley, Idaho maintained
their previous top ten rankings at No. 8, No. 9 and No. 10 respectively.
In the Eastern Coast the top three spots were maintained by the
previous year's winners but there was plenty of movement among the
remaining slots. Stowe, Vt., moved up two spots to No. 4 while Holiday
Valley, N.Y., moved up four spots to No. 5. Sugarbush, Vt., coming in at
No. 7, was a new addition to the top ten list. Bretton Woods, N.H., the
only New Hampshire resort in the top ten, moved up one spot to No. 9.
Smuggler's Notch, Vt., raking No. 2 for the second year in a row, also
pulled top honors as the nation's top resort for a Family Ski Trip in the
lifestyle rankings.
The top 10 resorts according to SKI Magazine's readers:

1. Deer Valley, Utah 6. Park City, Utah
2. Vail, Colo. 7. Breckenridge, Colo.
3. Whistler/Blackcomb, B.C. 8. Beaver Creek, Colo.
4. Aspen, Colo. 9. Steamboat, Colo.
5. Snowmass, Colo. 10. Sun Valley, Idaho

The top 10 resorts in the East according to SKI Magazine's readers:

1. Tremblant, Que. 6. Sugarloaf, Maine
2. Smugglers Notch, Vt. 7. Sugarbush, Vt.
3. Whiteface, N.Y. 8. Killington, Vt.
4. Stowe, Vt. 9. Bretton Woods, N.H.
5. Holiday Valley, N.Y. 10. Okemo, Vt.
For a complete look at the "Top 50 Resort Guide," pick up the October
issue of SKI Magazine or visit http://www.skinet.com
Nearly 7,000 SKI Magazine subscribers responded to the "Top 50 Resort
Guide" survey, which was conducted by an independent research firm. It is
the most comprehensive and longest-running ski resort survey in the winter
sports industry. Resorts are ranked in 18 categories: Overall Satisfaction,
Access, Après Ski, Dining, Family Programs, Grooming, Lifts, Lodging,
Off-Hill Activities, On-Mountain Food, Scenery, Service, Snow,
Terrain/Challenge, Terrain/Variety, Terrain Parks, Value and Weather by SKI
subscribers who have skied the resorts for the past two seasons, skiing an
average of 23 days a year.
SKI Magazine (http://www.skinet.com) is published by Mountain Sports Media, a
Boulder-based division the Bonnier Corporation. The Bonnier Corporation
(http://www.bonniercorp.com) is one of the largest consumer-publishing groups in
America and the leading media company serving passionate, highly engaged
audiences through more than 40 special-interest magazines and related
multimedia projects and events.
PR Newswire
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
 

Sunday, September 09, 2007

Chautauqua Lake Bemus Bay Condos

Laying A Foundation
 Bemus Bay condominium project co-developer Paul Goldberg reviews the construction site plan with Howard Hanna Holt Real Estate agents at a recent tour of the Lakeside Drive property. GPS construction manager, John Paler, center, and project co-developer Lee Chilcote, center right wearing white hats look on. Howard Hanna Holt Real Estate is the exclusive marketing agent for the Bemus Bay condominiums.
9/9/2007 - Work Under Way For Bemus Bay Condos

By The Post-Journal Staff

BEMUS POINT — Foundations are being poured for the garages and the two buildings that will host 40 Bemus Bay condominium homes, and the project developers report that sales are approaching nearly half of the available units.

''We are extremely pleased with the success of the marketing program to date,'' co-developer Lee Chilcote told nearly a dozen Howard Hanna Holt Real Estate associates at what was billed as a ''muddy boots'' tour of the construction site last week.

There wasn't any mud to trudge through due to the dry summer weather, so the real estate agents got a close-up view of the foundation work and got to see how the new buildings will be arranged on the site.

Architects Donald Harrington and Stephen Whitney of Jamestown-based Harrington Sandberg Architecture & Engineering, PC explained where various first floor rooms of the units will be located in relation to the foundations that are in place, where the sliding glass doors will exit onto covered patios and where the swimming pool and gazebo will grace the commons central to both buildings.

Harrington pointed out the perimeter areas of the site that will be landscaped in an environmentally friendly manner using a bio-retention process to capture and cleanse roof, driveway and parking area water run-off before being allowed to flow into Chautauqua Lake.

''We had to take an innovative approach to water run-off because the site can't accommodate traditional run-off control methods,'' he explained. ''This approach is very 'green.' The landscaping that surrounds the site, the types of plants we'll use and the sub-surface soil grades will naturally filter the water and be very attractive in appearance.''

The real estate agents asked when the buyers who had signed contracts to purchase 16 of the 40 homes will be able to select from among the choices of kitchen cabinets, granite countertops and flooring.

Co-developer Paul Goldberg said that the selection process for suppliers was under way.

''We will be selecting very good suppliers who offer high quality products,'' Goldberg said. ''We are confident that buyers will have very good choices for their personalized finishes, but there will be a deadline.''

The condominium buildings, named Browning and Columbian, will be architecturally reminiscent of the two hotels of the same names that once stood on the site, and the low-rise building construction and site plan configuration have been designed to blend into the surroundings of the village that was founded in 1806.

Each of the homes at Bemus Bay, www.bemusbaycondos.com, will offer a private boat slip on Chautauqua Lake and owner conveniences including secured entry, handicapped access, elevator service, a covered garage and reserved parking spaces.

Four different floor plans with three bedrooms and two or three baths will include air conditioning, granite countertops, master suites, and a whirlpool bath and easy access to the property's heated swimming pool.

All units feature a private balcony or porch with stunning views of Chautauqua Lake.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Friday, September 07, 2007

Chautauqua County Events

Red, White, and Blues Fest is back
By MICHAEL RUKAVINA

9/6/2007 - OBSERVER Staff Writer

Don't pack away that Fourth of July paraphernalia just yet — the Red, White, and Blues Festival is just around the corner. One of the largest-scale festivals in the village is back to offer music fans some of the best talent around.

"This annual festival in downtown Fredonia draws the best blues bands from throughout the region," said 1891 Opera House Executive Director Rick Davis.

Combined with the Fredonia Chamber of Commerce's annual Taste of Fredonia, the Red, White & Blues Festival promises to be the best street party around.

Free concerts in the Village Square will feature Shaky Ray & the Cobalt Blues Band featuring "Shaky" Ray Diaz on lead vocals and harmonica at 6 p.m. on Friday and The Limits at 5 p.m. on Saturday. Marshall Seddon will perform from noon to 2 p.m. also on Saturday. All three performances will be held in the Gazebo in the Village's Barker Common Park. The SUNY Fredonia Percussions Guild will perform on Saturday from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in the east side of the Barker Common. Fredonia's many pubs and taverns also offer a variety of blues bands throughout the weekend, all accessible with no cover charge for a total of 12 hours of some of the best music around.

Participating establishments this year include, but are not limited to, The White Inn, Heenan's Pub, Eastside Grille, Valentine's Place, Old Main Inn, Muldoon's Pub, Coyle's Pub, Sunny's, Ellicottville BC, 41 West, Coughlan's Pub and the Barker Commons Gazebo.

People attending the festival are reminded that the open container policy will only be in effect on Saturday from 1:00 - 11:30 p.m, where patrons will only be allowed to bring their drink outside of the establishment which they purchased it at. Garbage bins will be used to mark where open container use is prohibited and no one will be allowed to carry an open container on to the streets or areas not permitted. Drivers should anticipate high pedestrian traffic on Water Street and should consider use of either Canadaway Street or Eagle and Norton streets to bypass any congestion, as Water Street will not be closed this year.

If it's the food you're interested in don't forget about the Taste of Fredonia from noon to 7 p.m in Barker Commons. This culinary celebration provides a sampling of cuisine from some of Fredonia's best restaurants and cafes. A "Taste of Fredonia for Kids" offers children the chance to create their own sweet confections as well as to enjoy entertainment specially designed for them, all free of charge. The children's activities will run from noon to 3 p.m. in the east side of the park.

For more information and a complete list of bands and times please call (888) 373-3664 or visit the village information booth or The White Inn for a free brochure.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

 

Wednesday, September 05, 2007

Chautauqua Lake Restaurant Earns Four Diamond Rating

Local French Restaurant Earns National Recognition
By JESSICA WASMUND

 Four-Star Cuisine

Jonathan Haloua, center, director of operations for Food is Good, Inc. stands outside La Fleur with his wife, Saskia Tounsi, manager of La Fleur, and Scott Bova, the restaurant's corporate executive chef. P-J photo by Jessica Wasmund
9/5/2007 - MAYVILLE — When La Fleur opened its doors five years ago, the restaurant seated about 50 people and offered a menu of delectable French cuisine.

Since then, the eatery has continued to grow and recently earned a four-diamond rating — making the quaint restaurant residing beside Chautauqua Lake a rarity in the world of fine dining.

''This is a goal we set a long time ago, when it was just the two of us sweating back in the kitchen, and we've finally gotten a chance to work on it this season,'' said Scott Bova, the Mayville restaurant's corporate executive chef. When he says ''two of us,'' Bova is referring to himself and Jonathan Haloua, the director of operations for La Fleur and corporate executive chef for Food is Good Inc. ''We took our visions, and together we made our dream come true — I can't even believe it.''

Bova described the goal as one that is ''definitely not easy to reach,'' as some of the finest places in New York are only four diamonds as opposed to five.

The rating system is determined by AAA, and is done so only after submitting an application, explained Haloua. First, an establishment must apply to be rated by AAA. Then, the organization will send out someone to report back, and it is always judged discreetly — it could be a single person or table of six. In La Fleur's case, a woman from Florida came up to rate the restaurant.

''The rating system is based on a lot of different factors, which are very specific,'' Bova said. ''Everything from flow of traffic, to the property the restaurant is on, to the level of service, China patterns, wine list, and of course exceptional food with local ingredients. Synchronized service is also required, where all the plates are brought and taken away at once, starting with the oldest woman and moving down in age, then onto men — that's something that's not easy to do, especially every time.''

Indeed, the booklet of criteria AAA uses to judge restaurants is more than 20 pages long. Food must be presented with the correct garnishes and comprised of the freshest ingredients. The service must be exceptional, with refined greetings and good manners.

One of the biggest challenges La Fleur faces is its seasonal operations, which means Bova, Haloua and his wife Saskia Tounsi, La Fleur's manager, have little more than a month to hire and train their staff to world-class levels each spring. Much of the staff has little to no experience — there are three interns and one high school student on staff. The medium age in the kitchen is 24, while most of the restaurant is less than 30 years of age.

See La FLEUR On Page A-3

Haloua has long had a deep feeling of sentiment for Chautauqua County and the region, having spent many summers during his childhood along the lake.

''My family is originally from Morocco, but we left after the country gained its independence and moved to France,'' Haloua said. ''My father kept in touch with one of his school friends who relocated to North America, and I spent a lot of time visiting the area.''

Henry K. ''Van'' McConnon, the owner of Food Is Good, contacted Haloua and Tounsi about relocating to the area to help him open a restaurant six years ago, so the pair came over. At the end of the summer, they realized the potential in the house they were living in and decided to go ahead and open a French restaurant, playing on the character offered by the building.

''At first Van told us he wasn't sure we could do it, between having to have the building zoned and everything else,'' Haloua said. ''But then we got a call in the middle of summer and he said yes, it could work, so we started. Since then it's been a lot of work — all the furniture is built by one of our sister companies, and the menu changes every summer, and even the artwork — much is originally from France.''

After their first summer, the pair made an addition to the house and doubled the kitchen, and Bova joined them in 2003 as a Haloua's sous-chef before being promoted to chef de cuisine.

La Fleur is the first restaurant in the region to be hailed as four-diamonds, the second-closest being in Bradford.

''Scott has really done beautifully — this is the year he perfected his style,'' Haloua said.

Yet now that La Fleur has reached such a high level, the pressure is on to keep things at such a standard.

''Once you've reached this level, people will travel miles and miles to dine and you have to be ready,'' Bova said. ''There's little places in the middle of nowhere that are four-diamond restaurants and you would never expect. You can find them easily in New York City, but not here.''

During the first few years of operation, more than 90 percent of customers were people from Chautauqua County, whether they were spending their summer vacation along the lake or had permanent residency. According to Haloua, however, every year the eatery sees a different crowd, with people coming from Buffalo, Jamestown, Cleveland and Warren. He says that many people chose to celebrate special occasions such as anniversaries with La Fleur.

In the off-season, Hova prepares La Fleur's up coming menu, and the group gets together to debate different dining options. More than 70 percent of the menu is altered each year, and even their signature dishes are given some new life annually.



Life Before La Fleur

''I attended cooking school at 14 where I trained for four years, and I was the youngest person in my class,'' Haloua said. ''After graduating from the Paris Culinary Institute, I worked as a chef for a catering company which was a great experience because of the wide variety of cooking.''

Upon moving back to Paris, Haloua met Tounsi, where they both worked in the food industry, while she did some additional work in fashion. For a change of pace, the couple purchased a night club in the French Alps, which gave them plenty of opportunity to work alongside one another, before returning to Chautauqua Lake.

Bova, like Haloua, knew for a long time he was destined to work in a kitchen.

''I knew since I was four I wanted to be a chef, and went to the Cooking Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York at 18, afterwards spending two years in the Outerbanks, North Carolina,'' Bova said. ''While I was there I had the opportunity to work for a four-diamond restaurant, then in the summer of 2004, I came up here to be Jonathan's sous-chef. I then moved to Virginia for a year and worked at a five-star, five-diamond restaurant, which is really rare since there's only about 20 in the United States.''

A year later, Haolua convinced Bova to return, and has been running La Fleur's kitchen ever since.



What's Next On The Menu

Behind La Fleur is The Red Brick Farm marketplace where a number of shops feature items produced by Food Is Good as well as other various shops and products.

On top of that, the company is offering cooking classes in conjunction with JCC for those interested in becoming chefs in their own right.

''Five-star establishments are really unique, it takes long-term planning and a large monetary commitment,'' Haloua said. ''So I won't say we won't see it in the next 10 years, but not necessarily soon.''

More importantly, Hova said, is maintaining the current ranking of four stars, something that can be harder to do than earning the rating in the first place.

''AAA comes back every year to inspect, and if you lose your rating you do so for two years,'' Hova said. ''There is no second chance, and every experience must be perfect. Everyone on staff plays an important part, from the dishwasher to server.''
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Fredonia Opera House

Fall series of events announced at 1891 Fredonia Opera House
 
9/5/2007 - Fall at the 1891 Fredonia Opera House will offer an assortment of live performance events, with everything from classical music to comedy, free folk music to freewheeling stories, and British pop artists to everyone's favorite nun.

"We've worked to schedule what we think is a nice mix of events," said Opera House Executive Director Rick Davis. "Some events are the result of suggestions from patrons; others include artists that we think will appeal to many in the area. Overall, we believe the season offers a little something for everyone."

The fall series of events includes:

n Chad and Jeremy: Wednesday, Sept. 19, 8 p.m. Reserved seating, $22 ($20, Opera House members)

The famed 1960s pop duo of Chad and Jeremy, best known for the hits "Summer Song," "Yesterday's Gone" and "Willow Weep for Me," has reunited and is touring for the first time in 30 years. With 11 U.S. Top 40 hits and appearances on the Patty Duke Show, Dick Van Dyke Show, Hullabaloo, Shindig and Batman, Chad and Jeremy became one of the most successful of the British Invasion acts to follow the Beatles.

n Free-For-All: Sunday, Sept. 23, 3 p.m. Free admission.

The Opera House Folk in Fredonia Music Series kicks off its 2007-08 events with this annual free performance. Folk in Fredonia sponsors Carmen and Dick Gilman have pulled together an afternoon program of fine folk music, step dancing and storytelling.

n Stories from the Pumpkin Patch: Saturday, Oct. 13, 2 p.m. Free admission.

This free storytelling event for children is part of the Opera House's annual Fredonia Storytelling Festival. It features stories from throughout New York state — from New York City to the Finger Lakes to an elm bark longhouse in Western New York — and includes an Iroquois legend, an African-American Halloween tale, a Jewish folktale and a tall tale about Johnny Appleseed, all with a harvest theme. The stories are told by The Wondermakers, a group of improvisational actors from Buffalo and Rochester who trained with Second City Toronto & Chicago and City Limits NYC.

n A Storytelling Cabaret, featuring Dennis Collins, Annemarie Jason, Doug Manly, John Scott, Chris Shaw and Nick Siracuse: Saturday, Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m. General admission, $10.

The Fredonia Storytelling Festival continues with this special event for adults only. Several regional storytellers and Adirondack singer/songwriter/storyteller Chris Shaw will gather to share wild and witty stories designed to tickle your funny bone and make you laugh out loud. The ticket includes a post-show reception with the storytellers and light refreshments.

n Ying Quartet: Saturday, Oct. 20, 8 p.m. General admission, $15 ($12, Opera House members; $10, students/children).

One of the nation's most sought-after string music ensembles, the Grammy Award-winning Ying Quartet is well known throughout the classical music world for impeccable musicianship and artistic expression. Playing together for more than 15 years, the Ying siblings have played throughout the world for audiences ranging in size from six to 6,000.

n Fieldstone: Saturday, Nov. 10, 8 p.m. General admission, $15 ($12, Opera House members).

"Celtic music with an artful American twist" is how Fieldstone describes its music. This group from north central Pennsylvania mixes traditional Irish and Scottish tunes with Old Time and Appalachian influences and features 2005 and 2006 Pennsylvania State Fiddle Champion Tara Sansom.

n White Christmas: Saturday, Dec. 1, 8 p.m. Free admission.

As a gift to the community, the Opera House and D.R. Barker Library join forces to present this holiday film classic. Seen and loved for years by millions, nothing can compare to seeing it on the big screen in the venerable Opera House beautifully decorated for the holidays. This is part of the village's Miracle on Main Street celebration.

n Sister's Christmas Catechism: Saturday, Dec. 8, 8 p.m. Reserved seating, $27 ($25, Opera House members).

Taking a seat in the audience puts you in Sister's classroom — and at her mercy! In this hilarious interactive holiday show, Sister returns to the Opera House with plans for a special Christmas celebration. In the process, she becomes convinced that someone has stolen the Magi's gold. What transpires is a crime scene re-enactment that puts even CSI to shame.

n Dufflebag Theatre presents "A Christmas Carol:" Friday, Dec. 14, 7 p.m. General admission, $10 ($8, seniors/students; $5, children 12 and under).

This interactive version of Dickens' tale of Ebenezer Scrooge lets the audience play along (literally) as unsuspecting audience members are plucked from their seats to serve as cast members. After being given a costume from the trunk, that person becomes Tiny Tim, the Ghost of Christmas Past or even Scrooge himself. It's spontaneous and hilarious family fun for the holidays.

Opera House Fall Series events are supported in part by the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the United Arts Appeal of Chautauqua County.

Tickets to all events are on sale now. For more information or to reserve or purchase tickets, call the Fredonia Opera House Box Office at 679-1891 or visit www.fredopera.org.
 
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com


 

Tuesday, September 04, 2007

Chautauqua County Events Calender

Events
9/7/2007 - Local Music Showcase Kickoff at the Farmer's Market , Third Street, Jamestown , Chautauqua County  Join singer/songwriters Brian Hanna and Michael Salamone during the Farmers Market for a free concert. At 4:30 pm, folk duo Nate & Kate will put on a free concert under the Reg Lenna marquee. At 6:30 pm the Erie Saxaphone Quartet will perform for free as well.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.3thick.com/LMS. 281

9/7/2007 - Quilts for Kids Quilt-In , Quilted Memories, Route 5, Dunkirk , Chautauqua County  Quilts for Kids will be holding a monthly get-together to make quilts for needy children the first Friday of each month. The first meeting will be Friday, September 7, 10:30 a.m., at Quilted Memories, on Route 5, in Dunkirk. All fabric is provided. Please bring your own sewing machine.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-326-6326 , Westfieldnyq4k@aol.com. 268

9/8/2007 - "Hi Neighbor" Golf Classic , Rosebrook Golf Course, Silver Creek , Chautauqua County  Entry fee includes golf cart, day of golf, lunch, dinner and entertainment. Chinese Auction and lots of prizes.  Cost is $60 per person. , More Info. at: 716-951-7282. 253

9/8/2007 - BIG BLUE Fall Garage Sale , Clark and Liberty Streets, Warren , Warren County  Event is from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.warrenpamainstreet.org. 127

9/8/2007 - 2nd annual Brocton Portland Community Festival , Downtown Brocton, Brocton , Chautauqua County  Saturday Events: Community Unity Walk along Rails to Trails, Classic Car Cruise In, Crafters and Vendors, Childrens' activities 12-4 p.m., Bounce House, Petting Zoo, Auto paint , smash and blow up followed by extraction demo by the Brocton Fire Dept. Chaut. Co. Sheriffs' Operation Safe Child, Car seat safety check and R.U.O.K. senior Citizen program, Chinese Auction, Magic show with the Great Runfola, Street dance 7-11 p.m. with BOGUS OTIS.
Sunday: Chicken BBQ by the Brocton and Portland Fire departments, Festival Idol Karaoke Finals, Main St. Parade, Horseshoe tournament, Antique Tractor and Engine Show, Street dance with THE RUSTIC RAMBLERS  Cost is FREE.
, More Info. at: 716-792-9930. 251

9/8/2007 - Chautauqua Region WORD's Local Music Showcase 2007 , Downtown Jamestown, Jamestown , Chautauqua County  Chautauqua Region WORD's Local Music Showcase is an annual fundraising event for The Infinity Performing Arts Program. This exciting event brings together over 50 local musicians and bands who will be donating their time and talent for a full day of music to benefit The Infinity Performing Arts Program, Inc. The daytime portion will take place outside on East Third Street. The street will be blocked off, bleachers will be provided and free concerts will be held from noon until 6 on the main stage at Potter's Terrace. Starting at 7:00 PM programming moves inside to the following venues: Infinity Café, The Holiday Inn, Roberto's, The Labyrinth ,The Jamestown Ice Arena, Mojo's, The Wine Cellar, The Pub, Forte`, Reg. Studio, and Shawbucks. The following musicians & bands will be performing at those venues:
Big Leg Emma, Porcelain Bus Drivers, The Bill Ward Band, The Audience, Kev Rowe, The Haybalers, Little Dirty Goat, Phantasm, Everything Ends, The Rude Boy, Desecrator, I am Frankie Scrapmetal, Discidium, Jeff Erickson, FDH2O, Two for Flinching, Fatal Mishap, Machine Complex, Matt Maloof and Contra Band, Brain Hanna, Gary Peters, Cindy Haight,
Cale Hawkins, RnD Welling, Andy Minton, Saving Chance, Jacinta Whitcome, GAHU Drum Ensemble, Tiny & Twiz, Tiny B, Charity/Amanda/Steve, Infinity Performing Arts Bands.  Cost is Tickets for a single venue will be $5 each, or an all access pass to all venues is just $10..
, More Info. at: 716-664-0991. 249

9/8/2007 - SeptemberFest , 2264 King Road, Forestville , Chautauqua County  Silent and live auctions to be held Saturday with all proceeds to benefit Buffalo Sabres' goalie Ryan Miller's Steadfast Foundation. Special appearance by Ryan on Saturday from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.merrittestatewinery.com. 272

9/8/2007 - Wild Wind Folk Art & Craft Festival , Warren County Fairgrounds, Pittsfield, PA, Warren , Warren County  Award-winning Festival features 140 juried artisans, delectable foods, live music, children's activities, educational demonstrations, sheep herding demo on Sunday. Held rain or shine as most exhibits are under cover.  Cost is $6 adults; $4 seniors (65); 12 and under free (two day pass). , More Info. at: www.wildwindfestival.com. 250

9/12/2007 - Treating & Preventing Knee Injuries Seminar , Riverwalk Center, 15 S. Main Street, Suite 220, Jamestown , Chautauqua County  Chautauqua PT, OT & SLP Professionals. FREE Helping You Help Yourself Seminar - Treating & Preventing Knee Pain. RSVP required 488-2322. Seating is limited. Light refreshments will be served.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-488-2322. 282

9/19/2007 - Chad & Jeremy , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County   8 p.m. The famed 60s pop duo with hits including Yesterday's Gone, Summer Song and Willow Weep For Me, on tour for the first time in 30 years. One of the most successful of the British invasion acts, Chad Stuart & Jeremy Clyde still deliver the lush sound that made them folk pop royalty!  Cost is $22 , $20 Opera House members. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 80

9/22/2007 - Harvest Roast Beef Dinner & Theme Basket Raffle , 4th Street & Washington Avenue, Dunkirk , Chautauqua County  St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church Annual Roast Beef Dinner and Theme Basket Raffle will be held Saturday, September 22, 2007 from 4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. in the Parish Hall, 4th and Washington Ave. Dinner includes roast beef, mashed potatoes and gravy, squash, beets, carrots, cole slaw, sliced tomatoes, rolls and butter, homemade pies and beverages.  Cost is $8,00 for Adults, and $5.50 for Children. , More Info. at: 716-366-1750. 274

9/23/2007 - Folk in Fredonia Free-for-All , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  3 p.m. Fredonia Folk music favorites Dick & Carmen Gilman gather friends from throughout the state for a great afternoon of fun folk music and dance.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 81

9/23/2007 - Paws In The Park , Joseph DeFrees Pavilion - Betts Park, Warren , Warren County  Starts at 12:00 p.m. Planned activities are: A demonstration by Donna Anderson of the AKC's Canine Good Citizen Test followed by a brief Q&A session on dog behavior problems, Musical chairs for dogs and their owners, the Doggie Party Costume Parade, and the doggie scavenger hunt! Music provided by DJ Mark Christy. Blessing of the Animals by Father Ray Gramata.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.warrenhumanesociety.org. 280

9/28/2007 - 30th Annual Falling Leaves Festival , Veteran's Park; Broad Street, Salamanca , Cattaraugus County  Food, crafts, live entertainment, boxing, 5k run, Dueling Pianos, Lumberjack Show, and much more over the weekend event.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.SalamancaChamber.com. 179

9/30/2007 - Busti Apple Festival , 3443 Lawson Rd, Busti , Chautauqua County  11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. There will be around 130 homemade craft vendors, demonstration of weaving, spinning, corn husk dolls and many others will be performed, farmers market, apple, peach, blueberry, blackberry, raspberry, cherry and strawberry rhubarb pies, a variety of apples for sale, apple cider, candy apples and funnel cakes, country store with fresh baked goods, hot dogs, hamburgers, beef on wick, Kettle Corn. Busti Mill & Museum will be open.  Cost is $3.00 per person, children under 12 are free. , More Info. at: 716-483-3670. 277

10/6/2007 - Saints and Sinners Cemetery Tours , Lake View Cemetery, Jamestown , Chautauqua County  October 6, 13, 20, 27 : "Saints and Sinners" tours of Lake View Cemetery. Afternoon and evening tours of the grand Lake View Cemetery. Costumed actors and knowledgeable guides will help you discover a few of the fascinating stories buried in the cemetery! $5 for adults, $3 children 5-12 & free for members. 2 p.m. tours on Oct. 6th & 20th. 7 p.m. tours on Oct. 6, 13, 20 & 27th.  Cost is $5.00 for adults , $3.00 for children 5-12 , & FREE for members. , More Info. at: www.fentonhistorycenter.org. 108

10/20/2007 - The Ying Quartet , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  8 p.m. The quartet-in-residence at the Eastman School of Music, the Ying siblings have been performing together for nearly 15 years and are one of the nation's most sought-after string quartets.  Cost is $15 , $12 Opera House members, $10 students. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 82

10/21/2007 - Trail Of Treats , Warren Mall, 1666 Market Street, Warren , Warren County  On Sunday, October 21, children can visit the Warren Mall, for Trail of Treats, from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. to parade their costumes and fill their bags with goodies. The PNC Bank Trail of Treats event will provide a fun, indoor, climate-controlled environment for children to enjoy the Trick or Treating experience. It's sure to be a Spook-tacular time!  Cost is $1.00 per child. , More Info. at: www.achievementctr.org, or call 814-459-2755, 888-821-3110. 266

11/3/2007 - Annual Christmas Craft Bazaar , Fire hall on Main Street, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County  10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Kitchen will be open and serving home made food all day
32 tables of handmade crafts and baked goods. NO flea market or party plans allowed.
Chinese auction, raffle and free door prize drawings all day.  Cost is FREE for admission.
, More Info. at: 716-769-7249 after 5 p.m.. 223

11/10/2007 - Fieldstone , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  8 p.m. This trio from northeastern Pennsylvania gives Celtic music an artful American twist by mixing traditional Irish and Scottish tunes with Old Time and Appalachian influences.  Cost is $15 , $12 Opera House members. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 83

11/10/2007 - Annual Turkey and Gun Raffle , Pleasant Social Hall 40 Fuller Avenue, Warren , Warren County  Doors Open at 6 p.m. Raffles start at 7 p.m.  Cost is Admission Free with Gun Ticket or $2.00 Donation. , More Info. at: 814-726-9594. 206

11/14/2007 - Anything That Floats, Allegheny River Raft Race , Rt.62, behind Wildwood Inn, Tidioute , Warren County     Cost is $5.00 per person. , More Info. at: 814-730-9351. 120

12/1/2007 - White Christmas , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  8 p.m. The 1954 holiday musical classic starring Bing Crosby, Rosemary Clooney and Danny Kaye, presented with free admission as our gift to the community.  Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 84

12/8/2007 - Sister's Christmas Catechism: The Mystery of the Magi's Gold , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  8 p.m. Sister is back! And in this, the latest in the Late Nite Catechism series, she employs techniques from her favorite TV show, The Forensic Files, to discover the whereabouts of the Magi's gold. It's hysterical interactive theatre!  Cost is $27 , $25 for Opera House members. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 109

12/14/2007 - Dufflebag Theatre's A Christmas Carol , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County  7 p.m. It's interactive theater at its finest when Dufflebag Theatre presents the classic tale of Ebenezer Scrooge and his visits with three Christmas spirits. Because it's interactive, unsuspecting audience members are called upon to play some of the tale's key roles.  Cost is $10 , $8 for seniors and students, $5 for children 12 & under. , More Info. at: www.fredopera.org , 716-679-1891. 110