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Monday, July 31, 2006

Local Chautauqua Events


8/19/2006 - Myers/Bennett Memorial Golf Tournament , Breezewood Golf Links, Falconer , Chautauqua County George Myers and Bill Bennett both served as Fire Chiefs in the Kennedy Fire Department. When George passed away Bill worked on a memorial tournament in George's name to Benefit Fire Prevention activities in the Falconer Schools. Bill passed away September 4, 2001 in an automobile accident in route to a call as chief of the department. So I carry on the names of both Bill and George and tournament in their names. Jon Payne, Kennedy Fire Department Cost is 55.00 per person. , More Info. at: 716-267-7955. 3369


8/19/2006 - The 3rd Annual Kristie's Kruise , Dewittville Fire Hall, Rt. 430, Dewittville , Chautauqua County Noon to 4pm. Classic Car Cruise-in, Tom's chicken BBQ, huge chinese auction, bake sale Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-753-7370. 3265


8/20/2006 - A Tribute to Elvis , 1 Lighthouse Point Dr. , Dunkirk , Chautauqua County Sunday Aug 20th 2 PM Patrick Johnson A Tribute to Elvis with Bigcity Thrill Band "Lighthouse Festival" Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: elvisliveslive.com. 3367


8/25/2006 - ZABAWA-- Polish Heritage Festival , East 23rd & Reed Streets, Erie , Erie(a) County Friday, 5-10pm, Saturday 1-10:30pm, Sunday 12-6pmLive Polka Music-bands from Erie, Pittsburgh and ToledoDancing and Polish Folk Dancers will be performingPolish Kitchen & BakeryPolka Mass - Saturday 5pm & Sunday 11amGames Raffles Children's Area Cost is FREE. More Info. at: 814-456-0671. 3365

8/26/2006 - Art at the Park , WWO building, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Satisfy your appetite for art at the WWO building where artists of various mediums will gather for an art show and sale. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-769-7190. 3305


8/26/2006 - Peter Phippen, World Flute Player , Community Center, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Peter Phippen, World Flute Player will share his talent at the Community Center at 7pm. Brought to you by the Findley Lake Nature Center. Cost is N/A. , More Info. at: 716-769-7610. 3304


8/27/2006 - Glenn Miller Orchestra , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County 7 p.m. Under Musical Director Larry O'Brien, the Glenn Miller Orchestra shows why it remains the most popular big band in the world today. Cost is $25 Reserved Seating ($23 Opera House members). , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org. 3235


9/22/2006 - Wine Country Harvest Festival , Gravel Pit and Gibson Parks, North East, PA, Erie , Erie(a) County Wine Country Harvest Festival. 25 Grape Years! Celebrate with us! Winery tours, Wine by the Glass, Arts & Crafts, Grape Stomping, Cruise-In, Bike Wine Country, Entertainment, Food and Fun! Call 814-725-4262 for more information or visit www.nechamber.org/winefest Cost is Gravel Pit Park $5; Gibson Park Free. , More Info. at: www.nechamber.org/winefest. 3319


9/22/2006 - Jeremy Kittel Trio , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, Fredonia , Chautauqua County 8 pm. US National Scottish Fiddle Champion Jeremy Kittel "plays with the skill, sensitivity and fire of the best Celtic fiddlers out there." Cost is $12 General Admission ($10 for Opera House members). , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org. 3270


9/23/2006 - Wine Country Harvest Festival , Gravel Pit and Gibson Parks, North East, PA, Erie , Erie(a) County Winery Tours, Cruise-In, Grape Stomping, Entertainment, Arts & Crafts, Bike Wine Country, Food and Fun! 25 Grape Years! Celebrate with us! Cost is Gravel Pit Park $5; Gibson Park Free. , More Info. at: www.nechamber.org/winefest or 814-725-4262. 3317


10/21/2006 - Peek 'n Peak Fall Fest , Peek 'n Peak, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County 10/14/2006-10/15/2006 and 10/21/2006-10/22/2006.Two weekends of family fun during our beautiful fall season. 75 juried crafters, farmers market, snow sports equipment swap, special kids activities and much more! Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-355-4141. 3310


10/25/2006 - Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, Fredonia , Chautauqua County 8 pm. The 1920 classic silent film starring John Barrymore brought to life with live original music performed by Devil Music Ensemble. Cost is $10. , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org. 3273


10/27/2006 - Norman Foote , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, Fredonia , Chautauqua County 7 pm. Award-winning entertainer/puppeteer Norman Foote puts his theatrical and comedic talents to use in a concert that is both interactive and original. His "props with an attitude" and nursery rhymes sung by rock stars make him a hit with children and adults alike! Cost is $12 General Admission ($10 seniors & students, $8 children under 12). , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org. 3274

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Sunday, July 30, 2006



Friday, Aug 4th


PARKING $5

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Official Opening of Sky Jam 2006

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Food Vendors

3:00pm - 6:00pm
Kite Flying

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Vendors/Crafters

3:00pm - 8:00pm
Petting Zoo

4:00pm - 6:00pm
Live Entertainment Featuring:
Emerald City Productions: the Volcaleeze Show

6:00pm - 9:00pm
Airplane Rides

6:30pm
Balloon Launch (weather permitting)

7:00pm - 9:20pm
Tethered Balloon Rides (weather permitting)

7:00pm - 9:00pm
Live Entertainment Featuring: Kokomo Time Band

9:15pm
Balloon Glow (weather permitting)

10:00pm
Day One Closes

Balloon Rides approximately $225 Per PersonContact Pilot Directly at Sky Jam

Saturday, Aug 5th

PARKING $5

6:30am
Balloon Launch (weather permitting)

3:00pm
Day 2 Official Opening of Sky Jam 2006

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Food Vendors

3:00pm - 6:00 pm
Kite Flying

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Vendors/Crafters

3:00pm - 8:00pm
Petting Zoo

4:00pm - 6:00pm
Live Entertainment Featuring: Shotgun Suite

6:00pm - 9:00pm
Airplane Rides

6:00pm - 6:30pm
Balloon Basics Workshop

6:30pm
Balloon Launch (weather permitting)

7:00pm-9:20pm
Tethered Balloon Rides (weather permitting)

7:00pm-9:00pm
Live Stage Entertainment: Chautauqua Idols

9:15pm
Balloon Glow (weather permitting)

10:00pm
SkyJam 2006 Closes

Balloon Rides approximately $225 Per PersonContact Pilot Directly at Sky Jam

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Friday, July 28, 2006

DEC ACQUIRES CHAUTAUQUA LAKE WATERFRONT PROPERTY
Over 2,000 feet of Undeveloped Lake Frontage Protected


ALBANY, NY -- (07/28/2006; 1520)(EIS) -- New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Commissioner Denise M. Sheehan today announced that the State has acquired 23.7 acres of shoreline property along Western New York's Chautauqua Lake in the Town of Ellery, Chautauqua County. Acquisition of the remaining parcels of the former Cheney property provides the State with an additional 2,246 feet of undeveloped lake frontage.
"New York State's acquisition of this beautiful shoreline property will help protect water quality and the ecological health of Chautauqua Lake," Commissioner Sheehan said. "DEC will continue working with our partners on the State and local levels to fulfill Governor Pataki's commitment to open space preservation so that significant fish and wildlife habitat, public recreational opportunities, and tourism can continue to be protected and fostered across New York."
The first of four parcels of the lakeside portion of the former Cheney property was acquired by the State in 1998 from Mr. John Cheney. That purchase protected 10.3 acres of land with 1,200 feet of lake frontage. The current acquisition from Cheney's siblings - Anabel Weise, Donna Stage, Edith Johnson and Rhea Cheney- was purchased using the State's Environmental Protection Fund and brings the DEC's holdings to 34 acres with 3,446 feet of undeveloped lake frontage.
This 23.7-acre shoreline property will protect spawning and nursery areas for important fish species, such as muskellunge, walleye, largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie and panfish. DEC will manage the Cheney lakefront parcels as a low-intensity access site offering shoreline fishing. A small parking area will be developed to allow parking for day use of the site.
Assemblyman William L. Parment said, "Chautauqua Lake preservation has always been a priority for me as a one of our community's most precious natural assets. We have worked on this important land acquisition for quite some time and I am pleased that the project has finally reached fruition. The Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy and the Cheney families deserve much credit for their commitment to preserving this beautiful open space."
Chautauqua County Executive Gregory J. Edwards said, "The completion of the purchase of this shoreline property highlights the importance of Chautauqua Lake to Governor Pataki and the Cheney family. All of the residents of our County are the benefactors of this significant step toward preserving our lake which is an essential part of the economic stability of our Region. The County of Chautauqua did not have the resources to secure this property and I am deeply grateful to those who promoted this project at the State level. This purchase will provide local access to the lake along with the environmental benefits of protecting this habitat. Hopefully this will be another step toward securing the additional resources necessary to address the many other issues effecting Chautauqua Lake."
John Jablonski III, Executive Director of the Chautauqua Watershed Conservancy, said, "Conserving this lengthy natural shoreline has been one of the highest priorities of the Conservancy since it's founding. We highly commend these families, State leaders and DEC staff for committing this site for the benefit of the public now and for generations to come. This action conserves the watershed water quality functions of this lakeshore as a pollution filter, helping to protect the lake against excess nutrients and sedimentation that fuel nuisance plant growth."
Centrally located in Chautauqua County, the 13,000-acre Chautauqua Lake provides anglers with tremendous fishing opportunities. The Lake is annually stocked by DEC with 13,000 muskellunge fingerlings from the State's Chautauqua Prendergast Hatchery, along with 200,000 walleye fingerlings from DEC's Chautauqua Prendergast and Oneida hatcheries.
The former Cheney properties were identified as important priorities for conservation in the State's Open Space Conservation Plan. The Regional Open Space Advisory Committee nominated these parcels under the "Chautauqua Lake Access, Shore Lands & Vistas" category and recommended their purchase. This acquisition is especially important, since less than 12 percent of the Lake's shoreline remains undeveloped.
Since 1995, the State has committed to the acquisition of nearly 960,000 acres statewide to be conserved and protected for public benefit and enjoyment. The acquisition of the Cheney property builds upon the permanently protected open space in Chautauqua County, such as the historic Midway Park site announced by Governor Pataki and for acquisition by the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in 2005. Midway Park, built in 1898, is located at the northern end of Chautauqua Lake. It is nationally recognized as the 16th oldest continuously operated amusement park in the county, is open seasonally and has been in operation for 107 consecutive years. Midway Park is one of only 12 remaining "Trolley Parks" in the United States.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit www.chautauqualakehomes.com


125th Chautauqua County Fair

Three-ring fun Silly Family Circus proves a hitBy MICHAEL A. RUKAVINA OBSERVER Staff Writer

OBSERVER Photo by Mike RukavinaTyler Blevins, right, of Virginia, shows off his muscles during Wednesday’s Silly Family Circus at the Chautauqua County Fair.


7/27/2006 - Balloon animals, juggling, crazy weight lifting contests were all showcased during Wednesday’s Silly Family Circus at the Chautauqua County Fair. Paul Jackmen of Syracuse has been entertaining for two years now and says everything has been going great at this year’s fair. “The people in the area have been great, this weather has been terrific, I mean except for the wind sometimes everything is going well,” said Jackmen. The Silly Family Circus is a free show which offers fun for the whole family with emphasis on audience participation. “I make balloon animals, do some juggling, I like to involve the children cause it’s all about them,” said Jackmen about what motivates him and the show. The show is running three times a day until the Fair concludes in the Arthur R. Maytum Mini-Stage

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Thursday, July 27, 2006

Theater at Chautauqua
by Anthony Chase



"The Art of Coarse Acting" runs through July 30 at Chautauqua.

The Chautauqua Theater Company is the resident professional theater and conservatory of the Chautauqua Institution. Now in its 23rd season, the company works with a resident company of 16 young actors from some of the best drama programs in America, and with principle players brought in to play featured roles. Under the leadership of co-artistic directors Vivienne Benesch and Ethan McSweeny, the programming has become increasingly challenging and wide-ranging, more in keeping with the mission of the venerable Chautauqua Theater Company itself.
This summer the season roared to a start with Anton Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard, a large-cast classic with doom and gloom aplenty. This has been followed by The Art of Coarse Acting by Michael Green, an unbridled evening of pure silliness, which played through July 30. The season will close out with Shakespeare’s comical and romantic Twelfth Night.
Along the way, the Chautauqua Theater Company is presenting readings of some intriguing new plays. Last week, for instance, the festival featured a world premier reading of New Burlington adapted by Jonathan Walker from John Baskin’s book, New Burlington: The Life and Death of an American Village, about a small town in Ohio that was intentionally drowned out of existence by the Tennessee Valley Authority as part of its flood control projects. Fascinatingly, a principle role was played for the one-night-only event by the remarkable Sada Thompson, the Tony and Emmy award-winning actress best known as the mother, Kate Lawrence, on the long-running television series “Family.”
“I had never been to Chautauqua before,” reveals Thompson by telephone from her home in Connecticut. “I first heard of Chautauqua in a Civil War novel, I think! I was intrigued to do this project because I had actually read John Baskin’s book and had suggested that it would make a marvelous stage adaptation. The part was not written specifically for me, but I am delighted to be able to help take the play on this part of its journey.”
The ability to attract big names is a hallmark of the Chautauqua experience, and in the theater, Benesch and McSweeny have interpreted this call to mean important actors from the Broadway and off-Broadway theater. Tucked into the cast of The Art of Coarse Acting, for example, are Dylan Baker (currently starring on NBC’s “Book of Daniel”) and Marylouise Burke, two actors whose names you may not know, but whose faces you will certainly recognize.
Burke is the muse of playwright David Lindsay-Abaire (Tony nominee this year for Rabbit Hole), and appeared in his plays Fuddy Meers, Kimberly Akimbo and Wonder of the World, earning enormous praise from New York critics for all three performances. She is featured in Robert Altman’s new film, A Prairie Home Companion, and will be remembered in Buffalo for her performance as the mother in the Kaufman & Hart comedy, You Can’t Take It With You. A first-rate character actress and comedienne of extraordinary talent, Burke explains, during a break from rehearsal that this is her first time at Chautauqua.
“I knew Vivienne [Benesch] because we had done The Matchmaker together at the McCarter in Princeton. And I knew Dylan’s work, but did not know him personally. My main motivation to come was that I really wanted to work with Dylan. But everybody told me that Chautauqua is just a beautiful place and they are right. Now that I am here I am enjoying the very supportive community. Everyone is very aware of the theater and very encouraging. I also enjoy the history of Chautauqua; I have a friend who is a retired minister, and when I told him I was coming here, he said, ‘Oh Chautauqua! I saw FDR speak there!’ I enjoyed that.”
The press materials describe The Art of Coarse Acting as “Noises Off meets Monty Python when the Bakersberg Community Theater undertakes an evening of chestnuts and masterpieces. From “The Cherry Sisters” (a hitherto undiscovered Chekhov fragment) and “Streuth” (not by Agatha Christie) to “All’s Well That Ends As You Like It” (based on an idea by William Shakespeare), BCT tackles the classics—and flattens them.
The range and aspiration of the Chautauqua Theater Company certainly bodes well for the future of theater at the festival, and its ability to continue to attract some of the most interesting theater practitioners working today.
The Art of Coarse Acting runs through July 30th, to be followed by Twelfth Night. A reading of 100 Saints You Should Know by Kate Fodor, about the life of a priest questioning his vocation, two teenagers searching for meaningful connection and a cleaning lady seeking revelation will take place August 3-5.
Further information and tickets can be obtained by visiting www.ciweb.org, by telephone at 716-357-6250 (Mon-Fri, 9am-4pm), or at the Institution ticket offices in the Colonnade lobby (Mon & Fri, 9am-5pm), the Main Gate Welcome Center and the Turner Community Center (Mon-Fri, 9am-8pm).

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Wednesday, July 26, 2006


Ship to sail on Chautauqua Lake

Submitted PhotoA replica of an authentic Viking ship is scheduled to sail along Chautauqua Lake today


7/26/2006 - As a prelude to the Fifth Annual Scandinavian Folk Festival being held at Jamestown Community College’s Jamestown Campus July 28 through 30, a replica of an authentic Viking ship is scheduled to sail along Chautauqua Lake today. The Norseman and its nine-member Viking crew will visit students at Love Elementary School early in the morning before entering the lake at Long Point State Park at 11:30 a.m. to sail to Bemus Point where they will dock from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. The next stop for the ship is Chautauqua Institution where the crew plans to dock from 3 to 4 p.m. before traveling to the Viking Lake Park to dock from 4:45 to 5:15 p.m. The ship will return to Bemus Point to dock from 6:30 to 8 p.m. At each point in the itinerary, crew members will discuss the ship and Viking traditions. Throughout the festival, the Norseman and its crew will be part of the Viking Village on the JCC Campus. The Norseman is one of two replicas operated by Leif Ericson Viking Ship, Inc. of Philadelphia, Pa., a nonprofit educational organization dedicated to the study, education, and promotion of Leif Ericson as the first European to set foot upon and explore the North American Continent and of Vikings in general. For additional information on the festival, call 716/338-1187 or visit http://www.scandinavianjamestown.org./

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Tuesday, July 25, 2006


Chautauqua County Fair Begins With A Bang

By ASHLEY PADDOCK

County Executive Greg Edwards, left, watches as Chautauqua County Fair President Jeanne Stewart and county legislators Sallie Pullano and Fred Croscut cut a cake celebrating the fair’s 125th year. Photo by Ashley Paddock


7/25/2006 - Special to The Post-Journal: The third time is the charm, or so the motto was for the opening ceremonies of the 125th Chautauqua County Fair on Monday as fair board members tried lighting the Revolutionary War-era cannon. The third try proved a success as the cannon surprised the crowd of legislators and county officials with a loud boom. Fair President Jeanne Stewart welcomed the crowd and the 4-H Teen Ambassadors sang the National Anthem. While the entries have been judged and people were able to see the winners, Stewart explained that some vendors had not yet arrived and the midway rides would not begin until early afternoon. Heavy rain earlier in the week caused a delay in preparing the rides for the event. ‘‘Today we’re making sure everyone is here and in place, the entries have been judged and you can see the winners,’’ Stewart said. ‘‘The weather looks beautiful and so far nothing has gone wrong.’’Following the opening events, legislators and county officials were given a tour of the fairgrounds, with the trolley dropping the guests off at the dairy barn for the unveiling of the newly renovated barn.Barn Renovation Committee members Robin Ormond and Diane Moss spoke of the new steel roof and steel end walls set in place by Mike Pinzok Construction of South Ripley. The renovations were made possible with the gracious donation of $32,000 by businesses, 4-H families and past 4-H family members. A sign was unveiled, located next to the 4-H Snack Shack, listing the names of families and businesses who donated funds for the project.‘‘Our roof was in desperate need of repair,’’ said Ormond. ‘‘We said that when you got wetter in here (the barn) than on the midway, it was time to get a new roof.’’‘‘A lot happened in a very short time and we’re very happy with the end result,’’ Moss said.Ormond added, ‘‘We can’t thank everyone enough, we’re so amazed with the support we’ve been given.’’Led by the 4-H Teen Ambassadors, the guests were treated to a tour of the agricultural barns. A cake and punch reception was held following demonstrations by 4-H members and the unveiling of a memorial for the late senator Patricia McGee.Senator Catharine Young was unable to attend the opening ceremonies. She was called back to Albany on business. However, she will be in attendance Thursday night when she will tour the barns, according to Kevin Muldowney, district representative for Sen. Young’s office.‘‘Growing up on a dairy farm, this is important to her,’’ he said. ‘‘She really loves it. It’s so great to see so many young kids involved. Involved kids are good kids.’’Other than the cannon malfunction, fair Manager Karen Cave said the event began very well. ‘‘It’s always a slow start opening day,’’ she said. ‘‘We have a full midway and the circus is up and running for two shows. I think it’s great.’’The nice weather drew in a respectable crowd. But, with midway rides down and vendors coming in late, this made for disconcerted fair goers. Bob and Becky Vass explained they came to walk around and see the exhibits, people and vendors, but discovered not everything was open. ‘‘We got here at 10 a.m. The fair opens at 10,’’ she said. ‘‘The fair should be open, not all the vendors were there to man their booths yet.’’Mr. Vass explained the rain slowed everyone down a day, however, he felt they still should have been prepared for the opening.Marilynne Northrop and her husband brought their two grandchildren, 6-year-old Ben and 3-year-old Neal Bachman, to the fair while their daughter delivers a baby. While the two cheered ‘‘yay, yay, yay’’ patiently waiting for the midway rides to begin, their grandmother explained the animal barns are her favorite part of the fair experience. Having strated showing cattle at 7 years of age, the animals bring back fond memories for her. Her husband and children were members of 4-H also. ‘‘These are our grandkids and we’re bringing them back to see this,’’ she said pointing to the barn. ‘‘They don’t raise animals,’’ she said. Ben then chimed in with, ‘‘We do raise two fish, Grandma.’’Visitors came from all over the county and even from out of state too. Scott and Sherrie Meyers of Nashville, Tenn. brought their son, while Jennifer Spencer brought her son, two nieces and nephew from Wilksboro, N.C.Despite the slow start, the promise of fun, excitement and laughter loomed in the midday sun.‘‘Come on down,’’ Stewart concluded. ‘‘The fair board directors have done a lot of work. So, come down and enjoy!’’


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
125th Chautauqua County Fair

TIM LATSHAW OBSERVER Staff Writer

7/24/2006 - Before the Chautauqua County Fair opens its gates to the public, a whole lot of equipment, people and animals must make their ways in first.Vendors, operators and other participants of the fair’s events and attractions made final preparations Sunday in anticipation of its 125th year grand opening today at 9 a.m.While many arrive two days prior to the fair’s opening to begin their preparations, Board of Directors President Jeanne Stewart said that heavy rains on Saturday gave some cause for worry.“A lot of people did not come yesterday (Saturday) to set up,” she said. “We were concerned, but they are here today.”J & J Amusements, the company responsible for the majority of the midway rides and attractions at the fair, made it to the fairgrounds after becoming stuck in mud at their last venue, Stewart said. The grounds began to take a familiar appearance Sunday evening as rides were erected into the sky and cars were added one-by-one to the Ferris wheel.The Victoria Circus, a new attraction to the fair, was also expected to make it in Sunday night. Planned acts from the circus include two different highwire acts, a motorcycle “globe of death” and a comedy trampoline routine.Preparations were going on inside the fair’s display barns and buildings as well. A team of approximately 18 judges had already finished distributing awards to the variety of arts, crafts and foods that fill Floral Hall, but workers were still busy preparing an area to host demonstrations throughout the week.“We’re glad we’re almost to the point of opening,” said hall superintendent Ann Woolley. “The hardest part is done.”Participants who brought more animate entries — cows, sheep, pigs, etc. —often have a little more time to prepare them for judging, but that doesn’t mean there is much time to loaf. Felicia Winton moved in 18 cows from her family’s Arlaine Farm on Saturday. Even with help from her brother Brooks, only about half of the cows were prepared for judging Wednesday.Glen Moss, who has been part of the fair for about 10 years, was preparing his own cows in another barn. When asked what he had done since 9 a.m. Saturday morning, he simply replied, “Everything.”“I’ve been getting the display ready, milking the cows and washing the cows,” he explained. Like many other animal keepers, Moss will be staying with his cows around the clock, sleeping on the fairgrounds until festivities end next Sunday.The fair’s opening ceremony will be held at 10:30 a.m., with state Sen. Catharine Young expected to speak. The dedication of the new dairy barn roof, made possible through over $25,000 of funding raised by 4-H members, will also be made.And while it may take quite a lot to be ready for that opening, Stewart is confident that the talents of all those involved in the preparations are enough to get the job done. “Everybody seems to take on a particular area,” she said, “but everyone pulls together and it all works out well.”


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Sunday, July 23, 2006



Skyjam Friday, Aug 4th

http://www.skyjamchautauqua.org/Index.html

PARKING $5

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Official Opening of Sky Jam 2006

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Food Vendors

3:00pm - 6:00pm
Kite Flying

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Vendors/Crafters

3:00pm - 8:00pm
Petting Zoo

4:00pm - 6:00pm
Live Entertainment Featuring:
Emerald City Productions: the Volcaleeze Show

6:00pm - 9:00pm
Airplane Rides

6:30pm
Balloon Launch (weather permitting)

7:00pm - 9:20pm
Tethered Balloon Rides (weather permitting)

7:00pm - 9:00pm
Live Entertainment Featuring: Kokomo Time Band

9:15pm
Balloon Glow (weather permitting)

10:00pm
Day One Closes

Balloon Rides approximately $225 Per PersonContact Pilot Directly at Sky Jam

Saturday, Aug 5th

PARKING $5

6:30am
Balloon Launch (weather permitting)

3:00pm
Day 2 Official Opening of Sky Jam 2006

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Food Vendors

3:00pm - 6:00 pm
Kite Flying

3:00pm - 10:00pm
Vendors/Crafters

3:00pm - 8:00pm
Petting Zoo

4:00pm - 6:00pm
Live Entertainment Featuring: Shotgun Suite

6:00pm - 9:00pm
Airplane Rides

6:00pm - 6:30pm
Balloon Basics Workshop

6:30pm
Balloon Launch (weather permitting)

7:00pm-9:20pm
Tethered Balloon Rides (weather permitting)

7:00pm-9:00pm
Live Stage Entertainment: Chautauqua Idols

9:15pm
Balloon Glow (weather permitting)

10:00pm
SkyJam 2006 Closes

Balloon Rides approximately $225 Per PersonContact Pilot Directly at Sky Jam


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
Luxury townhouse complex proposed in Ellicottville

By:CHRIS CHAPMAN , Staff Writer

ELLICOTTVILLE - An Amherst company is looking to build the largest townhouse project in the town's history; a 54-unit, $30 million resort community.

Amherst investment group, AWSC, LLC., is working with Ellicottville town officials on a proposal to build the Morningside Estates complex on a 10-acre plot of land off of the intersection of routes 219 and 242. The plot was acquired from developer Peter Krog.

The complex would be built in phases over the next five years, according to Craig Marlatt, executive vice president of Ross Wilson & Associates, an Amherst-based development company that is taking the lead in the project.
The construction of the project will bring an estimated 100 construction jobs to the area, according to Marlatt.

"The (construction) bidding will open to every one and done in multiple packages," Marlatt said. "We'll take bids on mechanical contractors, concrete contractors, and coordinating everything between all of them.
"Once this is up and running, there could be as many as 20 to 24 house keeping and maintenance positions," Marlatt said.

The economic impact of the project will be determinate on the preferences of the customer, according to Marlatt.
"There will be 54 units priced from $650,000 to $1.2 million, " Marlatt said. "That would give a figure between $30 million and $60 million."

Each of the units will have a drive-in garage and two stories of living space. All floor plans include a stone fire place in the unit, and an option of an exterior fireplace. The customer can choose from a two- or three-bedroom floor plan. According to Foit-Albert information, each unit will have a two-story glass wall.
A timetable for construction to begin is not yet known - the project is awaiting approval from town officials, as well as that of the New York State Attorney General's Office.

According to the town's building code enforcement officer, Tom Abriatis, final approval is not expected during July.

"They're going through the SEQR (State Environmental Quality Review) process. They're application is under review by the town engineer (Mark Alianello) for the sewer and drainage. We're waiting for more information. They're not on the agenda for this month," said Abriatis.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Holiday Valley Expansion 2006

Here we go again...Holiday Valley is spending $4.3 million on improvements for winter and summer operations this year. The 2006 capital project budget brings the 15 year total reinvestment to $45 million! The major projects this summer include construction of a 62 million gallon lake for snowmaking, expansion of the Junior Team Training Center/Upper Ski Patrol Room, continuation of the golf course renovation, Inn guest room renovations, terrain park and pipe improvements and web site improvements.

The 13 acre Spruce Lake, located west of the top of the Tannenbaum lift, will double the snowmaking capacity of the Valley’s already massive system. The large supply of water at the top of the mountain will enable crews to make more snow during cold weather resulting in better quality snow made more efficiently by using less energy. A pumping station and new underground piping will also be completed this summer. A lift is planned for the future that will originate near the base of Tannenbaum and run roughly perpendicular to the existing Tannenbaum Quad. A few slopes will be roughed in this summer in the area of the new lake. The Valley plans to make the lake available for fishing, canoeing and kayaking during future summer months and is considering real estate opportunities along the shore.

A note to White Trail and Finger Lakes Trail users: please observe the posted signs and follow the white blazes for the detour around the lake construction area. Logging and excavation operations are underway!

The Holiday Valley Training Center and Upper Patrol Room, located at the base of the Yodeler slope, is undergoing a major renovation. Useable space in the Training Center and Patrol will expand by approximately 50% and the exterior will receive a “facelift” so that it matches the beauty of the other lodges at Holiday Valley.

The major golf course renovation that began last fall is continuing, although play will not be interrupted during the summer season. Construction on holes number 12 through 17 is finished and they should be completely playable by mid-summer. This spring’s tree removal and excavation near existing number 11 tee, will make way for the new number 17 green. Work will begin this fall on numbers 1, 9, 10, 11 and 18 by adding tees, new bunkers and other interesting features.

With the meticulous care it has received, it is hard to believe that the Inn at Holiday Valley is over ten years old. Guest rooms at the Inn will be refreshed and refurbished with replacement of many of the soft goods like bedcovers and drapes.

To serve the ever growing diversities of Holiday Valley skiers and riders, terrain features will be expanded with some low rails and jumps. Our Head Park Ranger and Mountain Operations Manager attended Mt. Hood’s “Cutters Camp”, a week long training session for terrain park designers and groomers. Stay tuned for information on what they learned and other improvements they're planning for the parks and half pipe. We're also making a cut from the west side of the top of Cindy's Run to the base of Foxfire's headwall. This will give skiers and riders an alternate route to the halfpipe that is a bit less difficult than the headwall of Foxfire.

Two new web cams will be added to the Holiday Valley web site. In addition to the existing web cam at the Clubhouse, plans are to install one new camera in the Yodeler area and a second at a remote location using wireless technology. Now, visitors to holidayvalley.com will have an even better instant view of what’s happening at the Valley.

Over 50 additional items make up the balance of the projects that will be completed by the start of next winter season. According to Eshbaugh, “Continual improvement to our resort is vital to our success. Our customers have come to expect the best and we do our best to exceed those expectations.” See you on the slopes!

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Saturday, July 22, 2006


Relaxation is the point at Chautauqua Lake village

by CHRISTINE A. SMYCZYNSKI, Special to The News 7/16/2006

BEMUS POINT - Looking for a casual place to kick back and relax this summer? Look no further than Bemus Point, located on the shores of Chautauqua Lake, about a 90-minute drive from the Buffalo area.
The first settler to the area was William Bemus, who, in 1805, paid $1.50 for several hundred acres of land on both sides of Chautauqua Lake. He built a large log home near where the boat launch parking lot is now located. In 1811, Thomas Bemus (built a raft and poled it across the lake. A ferry has been operating across the lake from Bemus Point to Stow ever since.


During the late 1800s, people from all over the Chautauqua Lake area came to Bemus Point for entertainment. Steamboats, from both Jamestown and Mayville, plied the lake. During World War I, big bands played at the Bemus Point Casino; by the 1920s, a village park was developed with facilities for swimming, as well as tennis and shuffleboard courts.

There are no major attractions in Bemus Point, but that, in essence, is the point, because it is really a place to relax and get away from everyday life. What more do you need on a hot summer day than a beautiful waterfront, a place to stay and numerous stores and restaurants to choose from?

Probably one of the best-known dining establishments in Bemus Point is the Italian Fisherman, which is not merely a restaurant, but a lakeside entertainment experience. Patrons can arrive by car or boat and partake in a menu that includes fresh seafood, steaks and pasta. Enjoy dining in the indoor dining room or more casual dining on the back deck, with live music featured on Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. A side patio off the dining room is also available for dining. The restaurant has two bars: an upper bar featuring top-shelf drinks and fine wines, and a more casual lower bar, with martinis and live entertainment.


You can also enjoy appetizers and drinks in the "fish tank," a covered floating dock in the bay, which is a popular place to watch the sunset over Bemus Bay. Dining is also available on the adjacent "dockwalk" on the lawn next to the restaurant.

Entertainment takes place on the restaurant's unique floating stage, a 60-foot by 60-foot dock-like structure with a canopy that acts as a band shell. The stage is right outside the restaurant, in a portion of Chautauqua Lake referred to as Bemus Bay. You can watch entertainment from your blanket on shore or from aboard your boat anchored in the bay.


The Bemus Bay Pops first performed on Labor Day 1998 on the roof of the Italian Fisherman, with about 4,000 people in attendance. By 2002, more than 10,000 people attended the annual Labor Day concert. In 2003, the floating stage was built and the season was expanded to include a performance by the Bemus Bay Pops every Sunday during the summer season. Free movies are shown on the floating stage on Tuesdays, along with live entertainment on Friday and Saturday evenings. Refer to the Bemus Bay Pops Web site for a listing of events.


The Chautauqua Lake Idol contest between local singers takes place each Monday during July and August, with a big finale show scheduled for Aug. 21. The floating stage's season closes on Sept. 3, with a final concert by the Bemus Bay Pops, followed by fireworks.


Another village landmark is the Village Casino, which opened in 1930. The second floor was used for big band concerts by headliners such as Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Cab Calloway and Al Jolson. Today, the second floor is a banquet facility that can accommodate up to 500 guests.


Since the 1980s, the Casino has been a casual lakeside restaurants noted for its wings, crab cakes, sandwiches and burgers. In 1985, it broke the Guiness Book of World Records for the most chicken wings served in a 24-hour period. Live performances and other events take place almost every night throughout the summer season. With a docking facility right outside, patrons can arrive at the Casino by car, foot or boat.


There are also several other restaurants located along and near Main Street, including the Surf Club, Ye Hare N Hounds Inn and Bemus Bay Coffee.
The Victorian-era Hotel Lenhart has a large veranda and lawn facing Chautauqua Lake. The hotel has been operated by the same family - four generations now - since it opened in 1881. It has 53 guest rooms, some with private baths and many with shared baths. A full breakfast and dinner are included with accommodations. The dining room is also open to the public.
Hotel events include a Victorian Tea in the dining room at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays from late June through August. A variety of teas, along with scones, pastries, tea sandwiches and sweets are served ($20 a person, reservations required).


A behind-the-scenes historical tour of the hotel takes place at 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays. The tour is conducted by the hotel's current owners, John Lenhart Johnston and Barbara "Bebe" Johnston, who are the great grandchildren of John Lenhart, the hotel's original owner.

Wine tastings, featuring wines from Johnson Estates Winery, take place from 4 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays in July and August.

Other diversions in Bemus Point include several gift and specialty stores located along Main Street and Alburtus Avenue, where one can browse for clothing, home decor, children's items and gifts. Just west of the village, Longpoint State Park has nature trails, a playground, picnic facilities and a marina and boat launch.

In nearby Maple Springs, you'll find Midway Park, the 15th-oldest continually operating amusement park in the United States. When the park opened in 1898, people arrived by steamboat, train and trolley; today they arrive by car or speedboat. The park has several old-time favorite rides to choose from, including a restored Alan Herschell carousel, picnic facilities, a roller rink and miniature golf. The park, which is closed Monday and Tuesday, except for holidays, opens at 11 a.m. Rides open at 1 p.m.

If you go
For information on Bemus Point: http://www.bemuspt.com/
• Italian Fisherman, 61 Lakeside Drive, Bemus Point; 386-7000, http://www.italianfisherman.com/
• Bemus Bay Pops, performances on the floating stage next to Italian Fisherman; 386-7000, http://www.bemusbaypops.com/
• Village Casino, One Lakeside Drive, Bemus Point; 386-2333, http://www.bemuspointcasino.com/
• Hotel Lenhart, 20 Lakeshore Drive, Bemus Point; 386-2715, http://www.hotellenhart.com/
• Longpoint State Park, 4459 NY 430, Bemus Point; 386-2722
• Midway Park, NY 430, Maple Springs; 386-3165, www.midway-park.com

Directions
(from downtown Buffalo)
• Take the New York State Thruway to the Westfield exit.
• Take NY 394 to Mayville.
• Turn left on NY 430 and follow that route along the lake until you see the signs pointing to Bemus Point, about 10 miles.Christine Smyczynski is author of "Western New York An Explorer's Guide: From Niagara Falls and Southern Ontario to the Western Edge of the Finger Lakes."

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Thursday, July 20, 2006

We Hope To See You At The Fair

7/20/2006 - If you have grown up in these parts, you know that nothing heralds our arrival at midsummer more consistently than the opening of Chautauqua County Fair — followed in turn by fairs in Cattaraugus and then Warren counties.Summer days march through the calendar more swiftly than our sense of time prompts us to believe and so we are always surprised when fair time is upon us. But, in fact, the fairgrounds are bustling already in preparation for Monday’s opening of the 125th annual Chautauqua County Fair. It will run through Sunday, July 30.Those of you who go every year don’t need to be reminded to go again. You no doubt already have it on your schedule. If you haven’t been in a while, we encourage you to set aside time to take the whole family. The fairgrounds are off Central Avenue between Dunkirk and Fredonia — turn onto Waldorf Road. A complete schedule was included in yesterday’s special section on the county fair.For the youngsters especially, you will want visit the animal barns, the animal judging and events in the horse show arena. The fair has a wonderful midway, of course, and special events for children at the Arthur R. Maytum Family Theater every day. There’s plenty of 4-H and Future Farmers of America competition and horse and dog shows as well.The fair remains true to its rural roots by continuing the exhibits in Floral Hall, the farm museum, and the competition ranging from livestock judging to pie-baking. And, yes, evening grandstand entertainment includes demolition derbies, tractor pulls and figure 8 racing.The fair is a rollicking good time and a terrific bargain. Tickets are on sale now through Sunday for $6. In Jamestown, they are available at Ed Shults Chevrolet and Peterson Farm on Fluvanna Avenue and at all Quality Markets locations. Other ticket outlets throughout the county are listed at www.chautauquacountyfair.org. If purchased during fair week, tickets are $8 for Monday through Thursday and $9 for Saturday and Sunday — which is still a great bargain. The gates open at 9 a.m. and the rides start at 1.

We hope to see you there!

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Wednesday, July 19, 2006


JNK's Call of the Wild Sanctuary

Dedicated to the conservation of rare and endangered and wildlife. Our first priority is providing homes for placed, re-homed, adopted and rescued exotics, many formerly kept as pets by owners who were unable keep up with new regulations.
At our facility we currently house many species, including big cats; African and Asian Lions, Siberian (Amur) and Bengal Tigers, African Leopards; as well as North American Black Bears; Timber and Alaskan Interior Wolves; and Northern Red Foxes.
JNK's is open to the public by appointment from 10am to 6pm Monday through Saturday, and also does traveling educational exhibits. We visit schools, church groups, and Boy and Girl Scout Troops among others, to educate the public about the dangers to these animals both in the wild and in captivity. Please contact us to make an appointment or book an event.
More About Us
News
15 July, 2006
July Celebration
Saturday, July 22, 11:00am to 8:00pm
&
Sunday, July 23, 10:00am to 6:00pm
Admission $7 at the door, $5 presale

2185 Mill Creek Road
Sinclairville, NY 14782
www.jnkscallofthewild.org


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

CHAUTAUQUA LAKE IDOL 2006 SCHEDULE:

July 3 - Preliminary Night #1 (Kalen, Bob, Kristy, Keith & Lauren advance!)
July 17 - Preliminary Night #2 (Group #2 of 10 Singers Perform a SE93
Song)
July 24 - "Number One's Night" (10 Singers Perform a #1 Billboard Hit)
July 31 - "Showtune's Night" (8 Singers Perform a Musical Tune)
August 7 - "Motown Night" (6 Singers Perform a Classic Tune)
August 21 - "Final's Night" (3 Singers Perform a Song Of Choice)
SE93, and the Bemus Bay Pops offers the Chautauqua Lake Idol shows FREE of charge at the Floating Stage in Bemus Point. The competition begins at 6:30 P.M., and wraps up at roughly 8:30 P.M.. Come early to reserve your spot on shore, or anchor your boat in Bemus Bay! Enjoy food, drinks, and local singers performing with a stage band!
For the first time, you will be able to take part in every aspect of the competition through this website. You'll get an up-close and personal look at each of the performers and judges and you'll be able to cast your vote for your favorite Idol competitor through our Interactive Online Voting System. After each performance, come back to this website and click "Cast Your Vote!" in the menu to the left to let us know how you rate the competition. (These votes are public opinion only and will not reflect in the actual judging of the competition.)
Didn't make it to the show? Don't worry, we have you covered! For the first time, we will have the week's performances online so everyone gets a chance to follow the performances of their favorite Idol competitor. To listen to the performances each week, click "Music" in the menu to the left. Also coming soon listen to performances from the previous two years of Chautauqua Lake Idol!
IDOL UPDATE FOR SHOW #2

What an exciting second night of the Chautauqua Lake Idol Competition! The weather was perfect, and approximately thousands of people crowded the shores of the Italian Fisherman, and anchored their boats in Bemus Bay to watch our second group of 10 singers perform. Unfortunately, only 5 singers could move on to "Number One's Night on July 24th. They are: SHERI STAHLMAN, NANISHKA SALVA, GABRIELLA GIUFFRE, HAROLD SLAGLE, AND JAMZ PORZIO. They will join BOB TERREBERRY, KALEN HALL, KEITH WEBB, KRISTY BATINICH, AND LAUREN CECCHINI from week #1 NEXT MONDAY for "Number One's Night!"!
You can view photos from Show #1 in the Photo Gallery and take an interactive poll to vote for your favorite performer by clicking "Cast Your Vote!" in the Main Menu on the left of this page. Coming this week to the "Music" section are this Monday's performances. www.chautauqualakeidol.com
For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

July & August Chautauqua County Events Calender

7/20/2006 - Catt. Co. Firefighters Convention - Childhood Dreams , 70 Main Street - Randolph Fire Grounds, Randolph , Cattaraugus County Thursday, July 20th - 6pm Election of Officers, Annual Meeting & Memorial ServiceFriday, July 21st - 6pm Annual Banquet, 8:30pm The Jeff Beckley Band Saturday, July 22nd - All Day with Childrens Parade at 3pm, Grand Parade at 7:30pm with The Porcelain Bus Drivers to follow and Fireworks at 10pm. This is a family event the cost is FREE. More Info. at: ccvfa@buffalo.com.

7/21/2006 - National City’s International Rib Cook Off and Music Festival , PA & 2nd Aves between Liberty & Hickory Sts, Warren , Warren County July 19 to July 22, 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. each day. Seven National Champion Ribbers will compete for the title. Judging on Friday, 21st at 6:00 p.m. Amatuer Rib Competition on Sat. Call 814-723-7231 for more information. Food, music, arts and crafts, games, fun for the whole family. Cost is FREE. More Info. at: 814-723-7231. 3338

7/21/2006 - 5th Annual Highflyer Fly-in , Hunt Rd just south of Mickle Hill rd.@Highflyer Paraport, Warren , Warren County 5th Annual Highflyer Fly-in. Free to public to come and watch the newest thing Sweeping across the Country.Or maybe get up for a introductory flight, best viewing times are around 7:00 am and evening around 5:00 pm. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 814-664-9412. 3360


7/22/2006 - Mary Stahl & The Jim Calabrese Trio , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County Known for her jazz/cabaret vocal stylings, Mary Stahl's popularity has expanded well beyond her western NY roots. She joins with Jim Calabrese and his band for an evening of sultry, swinging and sensational entertainment. Cost is $20 General Admission. , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org 3233


7/22/2006 - Chicken and Biscuit Dinner , 2642 Lebanon Road, Steamburg, NY, Coldspring , Cattaraugus County 4:30- 7pm Cost is Adults $5, ages 4-10 $3, 3 and under are free. , More Info. at: 358-5778. 3351 7/22/2006 - 2006 Nashville Star Tour-1st annual Stars Over the Stadium , Olean Stadium, Olean , Cattaraugus County This will be an all day Music-Carnival event featuring live music, carnival rides, a midway full of games, a classic car cruisin', and a large selection of food and fun for the entire family! Gates open at 12 noon. Tickets available online at www.tickets.com, by phone at 888-397-3400, or in person at all TOPS FRIENDLY MARKETS. A large fireworks display with follow 2006 winner Chris Young's Nashville Star performance. Cost is $15 advance/$20 Day of. , More Info. at: http://www.262five.com/nashvilleStar/nashvilleStarTourInfo.htm 3237


7/22/2006 - Country Jamboree , Rod & Gun Club Rd, Ripley , Chautauqua County 3pm - 11pm. 3 Bands: Loose Change, Easy Street & Showdown Reloaded. Admission includes food & entertainment. There will also be prizes, Raffles, Giveaways & Chinese Auction. Special Kids area with activities & prizes. Cost is $10.00 adults, $5.00 6-16, 5 and under free. , More Info. at: http://ripleygunclub.tripod.com 3350



7/22/2006 - Art at the Park , WWO building, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Satisfy your appetite for art at the WWO building where artists of various mediums will gather for an art show and sale. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-769-7190. 3295


7/22/2006 - Yellow Perch Fishing Tournament , 11950 East Lake Road, North East, PA , Erie , Erie(a) County 3rd Annual Yellow Perch Tournament. Daily prizes, weekend prizes, door prizes and 50/50. Weigh-In Saturday 4-8 pm and Sunday noon-4 pm. For more information and entry form, call 814-725-4262 or 725-8244. Cost is $10 Adult; $8 Youth 12 and under. , More Info. at: 814-725-4262 or 725-8244. 3320


7/22/2006 - United Refining Company Amateur Rib Cooking Contest , PA Ave. between Hickory and Liberty Sts., Warren , Warren County This competition will be held on Saturday July 22nd starting at 10:00 a.m. and ending at 3:00 p.m. This will allow for 5 hours of cooking time. We suggest that you come early enough to set up your cooking equipment and be ready to begin on time. All contestants will be allowed to start cooking their ribs no earlier than 10:00 a.m. You may begin later if you choose to. The cooking will end promptly at 5:00 p.m. and judging will begin immediately after. For more information about how to participate in this Amateur Rib Cooking Constest sponsored by United Refining Company, call Jennifer at 814-723-7231. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 814-723-7231. 3361


7/23/2006 - Bible Conference , Camp Findley, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Camp Findley Bible Conference Cost is N/A. , More Info. at: 716-769-7146 www.campfindleyny.com 3297


7/23/2006 - Christmas in July , Findley Lake, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Cool off with thoughts of a White Christmas. Shops will preview their holiday treasures. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: N/A. 3296



7/24/2006 - Reflexology Workshop , 69 W. Main St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County Monday, July 24th at 7:00 PM inside Herbs For Life; Manuals included in cost. Must bring own supplies. Katrina is a Licensed Massage Therapist experienced in Holistic Reflexology. Class will also encorporate Hydrotherapy and some Aromatherapy. Please Register by Friday 7/21/06. Cost is $25.00. , More Info. at: 716-679-4646. 3340


7/26/2006 - Jimmy Buffet Tribute , Findley Lake Gazebo, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County "Live at the Gazebo" Son of a Sailor, Jimmy Buffet Tribute 7:00 p.m. Cost is N/A. , More Info. at: 716-769-7146 www.campfindleyny.com 3298


7/28/2006 - Scandinavian Folk Festival , 525 Falconer St., Jamestown , Chautauqua County Festival hours are 3-10 p.m., Friday; 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Saturday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sunday.Features live entertainment, workshops, Scandinavian food and gift vendors. For ticket information, call JCC box office, 716-338-1187.. , More Info. at: www.scandinavianjamestown.org 3219



7/29/2006 - 20th Anniversary Festival , On the Rocks Perennials - 9403 Utley Rd. - East Otto, NY, East Otto , Cattaraugus County EAST OTTO COUNTRY 20th ANNIVERSARY FESTIVALLeave the noise and bustle of the city behind. Treat your family to a day in EAST OTTO COUNTRY! A fun-filled day long festival will be held on Saturday, July 29 in the beautiful hills of Cattaraugus County. This free event will take place from 10 am – 5 pm at On The Rocks located at 9403 Utley Rd. in East Otto, NY, just one hour south of Buffalo. Arts and Craft displays will include handmade pottery and sculpture, original watercolors and prints, fine woodworking, floral designs, herbs and herbal products. There will be a variety of informative demonstrations throughout the day featuring the art of the potter’s wheel, the culinary uses of herbs, and Polish Country cooking and food. Master Gardeners from Cornell Cooperative Extension will be on hand to test soil and answer your gardening questions. You can purchase food and snacks from the 4-H concession, or bring a picnic lunch and enjoy listening to the upbeat sounds of Cocktail Rock, the one man band performance of local musician Steven Dudley.For a directional map visit our website at eastotto.com, or call 716-257-9549 for further information. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: www.eastotto.com 3359


7/29/2006 - Community Corn Roast , Community Center Picnic Pavilion, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Community Corn Roast. The Alexander Findley Community Library invites you to gather with friends and neighbors at the Community Center Picnic Pavilion. Cost is N/A. , More Info. at: 716-769-6568. 3299


8/12/2006 - Late Nite Catechism , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County 8 p.m. The international hit comedy that takes people nostalgically back to their grade school days. Regardless of your religious beliefs, when Sister enters the "classroom" the laughter never stops. Cost is $22 Reserved Seating ($20 Opera House members). , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org 3234


8/13/2006 - Classic Car Cruise In , Findley Lake, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County FLACC Classic Car Cruise In. Bring the family and enjoy a day of classic cars, classic rock and good old fashion fun! The day concludes with a car parade around the lake Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: http://www2.cecomet.net/flacc/public_html/CarPage.html 3303



8/19/2006 - The 3rd Annual Kristie's Kruise , Dewittville Fire Hall, Rt. 430, Dewittville , Chautauqua County Noon to 4pm. Classic Car Cruise-in, Tom's chicken BBQ, huge chinese auction, bake sale Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-753-7370. 3265


8/26/2006 - Art at the Park , WWO building, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Satisfy your appetite for art at the WWO building where artists of various mediums will gather for an art show and sale. Cost is FREE. , More Info. at: 716-769-7190. 3305



8/26/2006 - Peter Phippen, World Flute Player , Community Center, Findley Lake , Chautauqua County Peter Phippen, World Flute Player will share his talent at the Community Center at 7pm. Brought to you by the Findley Lake Nature Center. Cost is N/A. , More Info. at: 716-769-7610. 3304



8/27/2006 - Glenn Miller Orchestra , 1891 Fredonia Opera House, 9 Church St., Fredonia , Chautauqua County 7 p.m. Under Musical Director Larry O'Brien, the Glenn Miller Orchestra shows why it remains the most popular big band in the world today. Cost is $25 Reserved Seating ($23 Opera House members). , More Info. at: 716-679-1891, www.fredopera.org 3235


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Tuesday, July 18, 2006



Hot times

By MICHAEL A. RUKAVINA OBSERVER Staff Writer

OBSERVER Photo by Justin GoetzLifeguards Jamie Walker and Kristen Zolnoske keep an eye on swimmers at Wright Park Beach in Dunkirk. The recent heat wave has sent many to the beach seeking relief.

7/18/2006 - As you do your daily routine you may be noticing that you can’t rest your arm out your car window the way you want to without getting burned or you may find yourself rummaging through those bins of clothing that you only wear three months out of the year.Whatever the sign may be, it’s official that summer is here.Western New York residents have been through their fair share of never-ending winters followed by mediocre summers, but this year like last year is starting out to be another good one. After a beautiful weekend and more of the same 80-plus temperatures to follow, it’s safe to say the summer in Chautauqua County has begun and people better start preparing. To combat the heat, local residents have found solitude in area beaches that are currently open to the public. Main Street Beach in Dunkirk water has been tested and has been listed as satisfactory according to the Chautauqua County Beach Monitoring Program.“The beach has been terrific this year,” said John Dolce, owner of the Beach House Grill and Ice Cream Stand in Dunkirk. “It’s really been a continuous increase in people ... with the combination of the skatepark and volleyball courts the area has really been getting better each and every year.”Dolce said that a lot of people are starting to find the Beach House Grill as a hidden treasure. The area is a perfect retreat for any family on a warm summer’s day. For those who don’t have the time or means to make a special trip to escape the heat there is always the reliable air-conditioner. Local merchants have seen a spike in air-conditioner sales over the last couple days, Home Depot in Dunkirk is currently sold-out of them.Tony Cota, general manager of Value, said although air-conditioners and box fans may do the trick he feels most people forget about the possibility of a ceiling fan.“It’s a good way to cool yourself down, even if you have an air-conditioner in the room it will help to circulate the air a little better.”Cota also recommends deck stainers with UV protection and weather stripping for around window air-conditioners. If lounging on a beach or sitting in an air conditioned house doesn’t float your boat you may want to consider the extreme method for beating the heat, buying a pool.Pat Schroeder of Colley Pools in Fredonia said sales are doing very well and that business has kept installation crews very busy. It is the most extreme solution but one to consider for those who like the privacy of swimming in there own back-yard. Although the time of year is very carefree and enjoyable, it can also be dangerous to anyone who does not prepare themselves.The National Weather Service issued heat advisories Monday from the Hudson Valley to the Buffalo Region and high levels of ground-level ozone, a major component of smog, prompted state officials to issue an air quality health advisory for the entire state. For all those who decide to work or play outside be advised to always stay hydrated and to never over exert yourself while outside in 80-degree heat.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Monday, July 17, 2006

Late July Chautauqua County Events

July 25, 2006
TUESDAY, OUTDOOR MOVIE at BEMUS POINT'S FLOATING STAGE. The movie begins at Dusk. This is a free event. Bring a blanket or folding chair and snack if you'd like. You will be enjoying the outdoors and watching a movie called "Ned Devine" that will be projected out on the floating stage.

July 26, 2006
WEDNESDAY, CHAUTAUQUA COUNTY FAIR: County Fairgrounds, Central Avenue, Dunkirk, NY 14048 from 2:00 PM till 4:00 PM. Bring spending money for lunch and games. Come join us at the 2006 Chautauqua County Fair. You have a choice to enjoy the animals, check out the rides and eat great food.

July 28, 2006
FRIDAY, CRAFT FESTIVAL: YMCA Routes 20 and 394; 58 South Portage St, Westfield, NY from 4:00 PM till 6:00 PM. Bring spending money. Enjoy different craft vendors from all over NY state.

July 29, 2006
SATURDAY, 120 POUND ICE CREAM SUNDAE: Quality Stage Midway Park at 2:00 PM. This is a free event. You will be witnessing the construction on a 120# ice cream sundae. There is enough ice cream to feed 600 people. The construction takes approximately a half an hour and the crowd will be able to choose whatever topping they like.


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
Stow Hotel Under Debate

By NICHOLAS L. DEAN

7/17/2006 - STOW — Before ground is even broken, the possibility of development has one immediate effect on an area — it causes residents to debate.Though the North Harmony Town Board has not yet received the formal application on a proposed hotel project, people in Stow, Panama, Ashville and throughout the area are already discussing its pros and cons.During a board meeting July 10, Town Supervisor Sally Carlson and Deputy Supervisor Robert Yates read a letter discussing and supporting the project into the public record. Written by former council member Albert Brown, the letter outlined the two sides of the issue and seemed to support it in the end.Calling it an important flagship development, Brown asked the board to take a positive position in encouraging the hotel to be built. As he acknowledged, such a thing will take much work and need to overcome many bureaucratic obstacles before receiving approval.A permanent resident since 1981, Brown and his family have owned property in North Harmony since 1972. Having lived in California, Illinois and Michigan, Brown explained that he has previously been involved with planning and development in each of the three states and once headed a department which produced planners in Michigan.‘‘While the changes in this area over the past forty years have been both positive and negative, we remain optimistic that Chautauqua will remain an attractive place in which to live, work, recreate and enjoy life,’’ Brown wrote. ‘‘We are especially pleased that our children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and friends continue to visit this delightful setting.’’As proposed by developer John McGraw, the Hilton Hotel would be located on the 30-acre Bootey property in Stow. At eight stories tall, the hotel would have 150 rooms, 12 condominiums and cost $15 million to build. In February of this year, McGraw said that construction could be completed by early summer 2008 if he could break ground by April 2007. However, to do that, McGraw said the project would have to be ‘‘written in stone’’ by this summer.‘‘Bootey Bay is adjacent to Tom’s Point. It’s the state land,’’ Town Supervisor Sally Carlson said after the July 10 meeting. ‘‘We’re waiting for a formal application because we can’t do anything until we receive that.’’Stating that change is a constant, Brown wrote about how a society will inevitably impact and alter a landscape. Explaining that the relationship between costs, needs and desires of a society is always an issue, Brown said that the board will have to weigh the two points of conservation and planned change.‘‘Thirty years ago, Fairmount Avenue was a simple highway. Today it is a major transportation route with used car lots adjoining much of the roadside vista,’’ Brown wrote. ‘‘Fairmount development represents a lack of vision with piecemeal changes determining the ultimate landscape.’’As both Chautauqua Lake and the county are attractive and unique areas, Brown noted that the intersection of I-86 and Route 394 is a critical area. At less than a mile around, Brown questioned the future of the intersection.‘‘Will it have a quality development, with a sound financial base and be oriented to tourism, recreation and a quality of life and living as projected by Chautauqua Institution and the many quiet residential retreats along the lake and adjoining hills?’’ Brown wrote. ‘‘Or will it be the extension of unrestricted development with little or no regard to relationship with the values and potentials of this prime site?’’Proposed to be built near the Power Boat Club between Wells Bay and Stow Roads, the project would have breakout meeting rooms in addition to hotel rooms. One of the rooms — a 60-by-90-foot room overlooking the bay into Chautauqua Lake — would be used for weddings. When it was proposed by McGraw, Planning Board member Dick Sena explained that a special-use permit would be needed because the development is more than 10,000 feet. Additionally, he said North Harmony Planning Board members believe the hotel will be a great asset both to North Harmony and Chautauqua Lake.‘‘Myself as a builder, I’m thrilled. This will bring back the glory days of Chautauqua Lake,’’ Sena said in February. ‘‘We’re very excited about it.’’If built, Sena believes the hotel would create a ‘‘downtown’’ atmosphere in the Stow area and be a catalyst for numerous other shops and restaurants.‘‘Nothing seems more appropriate in development of the Stow ‘‘metropolitan’’ area than well-financed and planned quality housing, as well as eating and gathering facilities to serve the recreational, cultural and economic/business needs,’’ Brown said. ‘‘The addition of a multimillion investment asset should be welcome in an area dependent on ever inflationary assessment of private homes — often the sole residence of retirees and the elderly citizens.’’Citing Hogan’s Hut as an example, Brown said that the store has gone from being ‘‘a somewhat quaint to a very viable service for both residents and transients.’’ In addition to servicing residents, Brown pointed out that the hotel would be another employer in this end of the county — with a total of 100 full-time jobs and 50 part-time jobs being projected by the developers.‘‘I can understand motivation to keep North Harmony and little old Stow in the backwater by others with varying goods and less motivation,’’ Brown wrote. ‘‘Some negative attitudes and lack of positive leadership over the past few decades have created a Chautauqua County of low incomes, declining businesses with decreasing and aging populations and out migration of our youth. There are many opportunities to create a forward looking and more creative North Harmony without sacrificing the rustic factors which keep the area attractive.’’Before approval can be given, a State Environmental Quality Review would have to be completed on the impact of the project to the land. In February, McGraw said there are no wetlands so it appears there will not be any complications. The North Harmony Planning Board is involving the Chautauqua County Planning Board to make sure all the necessary permits are in place.The next meeting of the North Harmony Town Board will be held Monday, Aug. 7. Board members approved a resolution moving the meeting from Aug. 14. A public hearing which was to be held before the meeting will be rescheduled.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Sunday, July 16, 2006

Regatta Raises Money For Good Cause

By PATRICK L. FANELLI

7/16/2006 - LAKEWOOD — The sun came out and the wind picked up just in time for the opening race of the third annual Chautauqua Lake Championship Regatta on Saturday.In fact, principal race officer Jim Holler said they were the perfect conditions for a sailboat race — though some boat captains did have to struggle here and there to keep from tipping over.‘‘This is great, isn’t it?’’ said Al Nottage, regatta chairman and founder, as the boats lined up about a mile away from the Chautauqua Lake Yacht Club. ‘‘I love it.’’Nearly 30 captains participated in the race, more than the other two years combined, according to Nottage.‘‘This is double anything we’ve had before,’’ he said.The first race began at 11 a.m. with a strong wind emerging from the northwest. The Day Sailors, Lasers and Lightnings went first, followed by the E-scows a few minutes later and then the cruisers. They headed into the wind about a mile or so, then down wind about two miles, then back again — completing the loop two and a half times.There were a variety of sailors competing, from veterans and active racers to children.‘‘I’ve been sailing since I was 10 years old,’’ said Rick Turner, captain, while he and his young crew prepared their boat for launch. ‘‘We’ve been sailing around forever.’’It’s in the family, he said — in fact, his daughter is the national champion for racing small types of craft called optimus dinghies. Turner could be seen racing side-by-side with his brother, Mark, for much of the race.All proceeds from the regatta will benefit the American Cancer Society. There were even cancer survivors among the participants.John Carver had a melanoma surgically removed seven years ago. He raced on Saturday with his partner, Paul Bond, aboard their 26-foot cruiser called ‘‘Mad Chuck’’ — named for Carver’s children, Madeline and Charles.‘‘We race this boat in the Portsmouth fleet on Saturdays and Sundays,’’ Carver said of their chances. ‘‘I think we’re okay.’’Races continued into the afternoon. The final races will be held today and the awards ceremony is expected to commence at 12 or 12:30 p.m. at the Chautauqua Lake Yacht Club.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com
Visitors Bureau Assisting Businesses Draw Tourist

By DENNIS PHILLIPS

7/16/2006 - Andrew Nixon, Chautauqua County Visitors Bureau director, is making plans he hopes will get tourists to visit Chautauqua County and spend money.His job is to feature unique tourist destinations like Lake Erie, Chautauqua Lake and Chautauqua Institution. However, next year he’ll have a new feature to work with — more money.This year, the Visitors Bureau received about $245,000 from the county. In 2007, the Visitors Bureau will receive more than a 30 percent increase of $80,000 — totaling $325,000 — in money from the county. Nixon said the money is used to operate the I-86 rest area information center, which opened in 2005, promoting sports fishing and hunting, promoting group conferences/ sales conventions and marketing and advertising. ‘‘We buy media advertisements, we do the travel guide — quarter of a million printed — we do a program with the Allegheny region to purchase ads and do our Web site and answering inquires and mailing packets,’’ Nixon said.

The money the county gives the Visitors Bureau is from the bed tax. The Visitors Bureau received about 40 percent of the county’s bed tax revenue this year, but will receive 50 percent in 2007. Nixon said the additional money will be mostly used on marketing and advertising. ‘‘We want to produce electric marketing presentations like pod cast and video to use on our Web site and handout for sales purposes,’’ he said. ‘‘We’re going to do a video of Chautauqua County on our agritourism and summer recreation. This way people can look at them on the Web site or we can send DVD and CDs to media and group function planners.’’Nixon said the Visitors Bureau also wants to use the additional money to make its Web site a direct marketing tool and to add additional pages to the travel guide highlighting birding and cycling.‘‘We want to emphasis birding. It’s a growing national activity. We have to find what makes us unique,’’ he said. One unique attraction in Chautauqua County that Nixon discussed is Peek’n Peak. ‘‘There are a lot of ski areas and golf courses in the country, but, pretty soon, Peek’n Peak is going to be a top attraction,’’ he said. ‘‘So we are helping them in marketing. There product is going to be bigger and better, which makes our job easier.’’Businesses can become members of the Visitors Bureau and will receive a newsletter, link on the Visitors Bureau’s Web site and brochure placement at the Chautauqua Institution’s main gate and the I-86 welcome center. Nixon said the biggest source of income for the Visitors Bureau this year was from county businesses, which supplied $260,000. ‘‘We are the only organization that promotes the area as a tourist destination on a year-round basis. What we do drives occupancy rate,’’ he said. ‘‘I don’t want to sound like we’re the only reason. We do receive $260,000 from the private sector. That is quite an investment from the private sector. They make heavy investments through us in promoting the area as a tourist destination.’’Nixon said the Visitors Bureau spends about half its funds on personnel. The Visitors Bureau has three full-time employees and three part-time employees. The Visitors Bureau also has two independent contractors — one to promote fishing and hunting and to promote conferences/sales conventions, which the organization started promoting in 2006.In full-and part-time employees, the Visitors Bureau spends about $196,000 a year and spends $62,000 on the promotional contracts.The Visitors Bureau also has 25 volunteers who work at the I-86 rest area.‘‘They are retired senior volunteers through Lutheran Social Services,’’ Nixon said. ‘‘They just want to be part of promoting the county through the rest area. They try to relay the message to people that stop ’You need to plan a vacation in Chautauqua County.

For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Saturday, July 15, 2006

Bemus Point-Stow Ferry Now Open To Public

By MANLEY J. ANDERSON

7/15/2006 - STOW — The Bemus Point-Stow Ferry may have looked old and tired Friday afternoon but when it was fired up the over-water craft easily made it across the narrows and back on its maiden run of the 2006 season.On board were numerous Chautauqua County officials, including County Executive Gregory J. Edwards who said a ferry has provided transportation across the lake at the site every year beginning in 1811.Edwards said the volunteers and elected officials associated with the over-water transport recognize the importance it has for Chautauqua County. He cited the cooperation from North Harmony and Bemus Point, along with county Legislators Fred Croscut of Sherman, Frank Jay Gould of Ashville, and Richard C. Babbage of Bemus Point.Also acknowledged were the contributions of Harmony Town Clerk Sally P. Carlson and Bemus Point Mayor Bryan P. Dahlberg and his wife, Ann.Edwards said Chautauqua County brought the resources together with assistance from Rick Willman of the Summer Wind, associates of Chautauqua County Historic Vessels and ‘‘hands-on labor.’’ The county executive added, ‘‘It’s history and it’s future.’’All those associated with the project of getting the ferry back into service were commended for their ‘‘good solid work.’’‘‘We’ve been working on it for four weeks, ’’ said town of Ellery resident John C. Cheney, whose wife Betty and their son Jim also were instrumental in the project of again making the ferry seaworthy. Among others cited for their contributions were James Loutzenhiser, John and Rick Willman, Roger Miller, Duane Buchweitz, Brian Ceci and Sam Genco.Cheney said the ferry is licensed to carry two cars and 40 pedestrians but as of Friday afternoon no operating schedule had been prepared.He said the cost of riding on the carrier is expected to be the same as that posted on the vessel which is $1 for pedestrians and bicyclists, $4 for an auto and passengers, $2 for a motorcycle, and $1 per axle for trailers.

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Friday, July 14, 2006


Historical drama featured at 1891 Fredonia Opera House

Submitted photo
Christina Rausa, portraying Susan B. Anthony.

7/10/2006 - Susan B. Anthony Alive!, a one-woman historical drama featuring living history actress Christina Rausa, will be presented by the 1891 Fredonia Opera House Saturday at 8 p.m. The production is being presented as a featured part of the village of Fredonia’s Victorian Dazzle Festival.Anthony dedicated her life to the women’s suffrage movement. Her work paved the way for the passage in 1920, 14 years after her death, of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote. Born to a Quaker family with long activist traditions, Anthony developed a sense of justice and moral zeal early in life. After teaching for 15 years, she became active in the temperance movement. But because she was a woman, she was not allowed to speak at temperance rallies. This experience, and her acquaintance with Elizabeth Cady Stanton, led her to join the women’s rights movement in 1852. Ignoring opposition and abuse, Anthony traveled, lectured and canvassed the nation for the vote, ultimately becoming a national leader and one of the most powerful organizers of the women’s movement. She also campaigned for the abolition of slavery, women’s rights to their own property and earnings and women’s labor organizations. In 1900, she persuaded the University of Rochester to admit women. Anthony remained active in “the cause” until her death at 86 in March 1906.Bringing this outspoken pioneer to life on the stage is Rausa, a professional actress for more than 25 years. She is a Fredonia resident who has worked regionally and toured extensively throughout New York and Pennsylvania. She is a two-time recipient of Buffalo’s Artie Award for her portrayal of Emily Dickinson in William Luce’s The Belle of Amherst and for ensemble work in Ronald Harwood’s The Dresser. She also was an Artie Award nominee for her work in Educating Rita by Willy Russell.Rausa also is recipient of the Ann Burnstein Award for service to the community through radio and drama. She can be seen and heard in numerous radio and television commercials throughout the Rochester and Buffalo area.Susan B. Anthony Alive! is an original work written by Rausa in cooperation with the League of Women Voters. “The work has proven to be most inspiring despite the fact that when asked by the League of Women Voters to write and perform the piece, I initially was inclined to turn them down, afraid of the daunting nature of such a project,” Rausa said. “I am sincerely grateful to the league for not letting me off the hook.”Tickets are $9 general admission and may be purchased in person at the Opera House Box Office or by phone at 679-1891, Tuesday through Friday, 1 to 5 p.m. and Saturday, 2 to 5 p.m. The event is made possible with public funds from NYSCA, a state agency, and the United Arts Appeal of Chautauqua County. This event is also an Angel Ticket Program event. Funding from the United Way of Northern Chautauqua County provides a limited number of complimentary tickets through human service organizations to individuals and families whose circumstances otherwise would prevent them from attending a live performance. For information on the Angel Ticket Program, contact the Opera House at 679-1891.For information on the Victorian Dazzle festival, call 1-888-FREDONIA or visit http://www.festivalsfredonia.com/


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Thursday, July 13, 2006


Bemus Point-Stow Ferry Only Needs Insurance To Open To The Public

By PATRICK L. FANELLI

Up And Running John Cheney, Ellery resident and ferry expert, starts up the engine and watches the chain as it turns the motorized paddles on each side of the Bemus Point-Stow Ferry. Cheney has been instrumental in getting the ferry up and running again. P-J photo by Patrick L. Fanelli


7/13/2006 - STOW — Thanks to the work of two residents on opposite sides of Chautauqua Lake, the Bemus Point-Stow Ferry is now in perfect running condition and only needs insurance coverage before it can open to the public once again.John Cheney of Bemus Point and Roger Miller of Stow, both with longtime connections with the ferry, started up the engine Tuesday morning and explained how it works.‘‘They wanted to get the ferry running, they asked if I would do it, I said I would,’’ Cheney said — and he was true to his word.The pair have taken the ferry across Chautauqua Lake at least a dozen times so far while getting it up to speed and having it inspected. In fact, Cheney and Miller said it’s in even better condition than it was the last time it operated.‘‘It’s just plain neglect,’’ Cheney said. ‘‘This should have been done years ago.’’For one, they’ve replaced the oil in the engine — donated years ago by Cummins Inc. — as well as the central drive chain that links the engine with the paddles that propel the vessel. In addition, the paddle covers have been replaced; the deck has been refurbished; the ramps have been fixed; touch-up paint has been applied; and Cheney and Miller cleaned out the tank chambers below that keep the ferry afloat.‘‘That was the most labor intensive,’’ Cheney said. ‘‘They were in bad shape.’’Early reports indicated a frayed cable caused the ferry to be shut down last summer. However, upon closer inspection, Cheney realized the thick steel cable was barely damaged and would not need to be replaced.The ferry propels itself through the water with two rotating paddles on each side of the square vessel. Each is connected to the hydraulic diesel-powered engine via a chain like one on a bicycle, except many times larger. There are two parallel cables extending all the way across the lake — one for each side of the ferry — which navigates it to the docking platform on the other side. Each cable is several inches thick, generally far too strong to be severely damaged by a boat propeller.In fact, the ferry doesn’t really even need the cables to navigate — though it does make it a heck of a lot easier.‘‘They put a plate up there for a rudder,’’ Miller said. ‘‘They drove it to Mayville once.’’According to Cheney, the ferry has passed inspection and a license to run it has been obtained. A maritime survey was also conducted, and Dick Davies — Chautauqua County insurance director who is helping to obtain the necessary insurance coverage — said once the paperwork is processed, they can finally take it to insurance underwriters and apply for a policy.‘‘We’re approaching three or four markets to get the best price,’’ Davies said.It could cost upwards of $5,000 per year, according to Davies.Even with this expense, the cost of wages, the cost of maintenance and repair, and the five to seven gallons of diesel fuel it uses each day it operates, Cheney feels the attraction can easily pay for itself and turn a profit if its run right.It’s still unclear, though, how the insurance will initially be paid for. Residents working to get the ferry running again have already paid out-of-pocket for the project.Others have lent their support as well. Fritz Simmons donated the oil, and the county public works department has contributed some supplies. Cheney and Miller especially singled out County Legislator Fred Croscut, R-Sherman, and Rick Willman, Summer Wind captain, for their support.It can’t begin regular operation until its covered by an insurance policy, though — seemingly the last hurdle in the struggle to get the Bemus Point-Stow Ferry running again.‘‘It gets frustrating,’’ Cheney said. ‘‘You cross one bridge, and you get to another one


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com

Tuesday, July 11, 2006

BEER FROM THE SOUTHERN TIER

JASON AND TODD ALSTRÖM

The Southern Tier Brewing Company out of Lakewood, NY, makes great beer—as cofounder Phineas DeMink will tell you. DeMink grew up in Michigan, where he cut his teeth on brews from Bell’s in Kalamazoo, and eventually landed a job at Chicago’s Goose Island Beer Company. In the fall of 2002, he and fellow Goose Island brewer Matt Robbins started Southern Tier; soon after, they moved to New York. Their Lakewood brewery also houses a pub where patrons can enjoy pints following a tour of the facilities. (Road trip!) Today, their products can be found throughout the northeastern US, including, as of late 2005, Massachusetts.What makes Southern Tier beer great? One word: balance—something more brewers could stand to master. Far too many try to pack everything they can into their beers. Restraint increases drinkability, which in turn creates loyal consumers.We had a chance to hang out with DeMink over some pints of Southern Tier IPA last week at Cambridge Common [1667 Mass. Ave., Cambridge. 617.547.1228], where he explained that he and Robbins take as much time as they need to develop well-balanced beers. They’re worth the wait. IPAThis truly American twist on the classic India Pale Ale, triple-hopped with loads of complexity, is quite the session beer. We’d be happy to stick with it all night. 6.5 percent alcohol by volume (ABV). BeerAdvocate Score: 89 (Recommended)Phin and Matt’s Extraordinary AleAn exemplar of the American Pale Ale, this features distinct notes of grapefruit and a malty, caramel sweetness. 5.6 percent ABV. BeerAdvocate Score: 85 (Recommended)TripelThis hoppy take on the traditional Belgian beer balances fruity, candied sweetness with yeastiness and light phenols. Tripel fans might find that it errs on the side of subtlety, but it’s still unique. A deceptive 9.0 percent ABV. BeerAdvocate Score: 83 (Worth a Try)JAHVA Imperial Coffee StoutDeMink pits this one, brewed with Blue Mountain Jamaican coffee, up against Three Floyd’s Dark Lord Imperial Stout (which we currently list as the No. 3 beer in the world) and AleSmith’s Speedway Stout (currently No. 12). JAHVA is quite aggressive, with intense notes of roasted coffee, chocolate and anise softened by a sugary sweetness. BeerAdvocate Score: 88 (Recommended)Hop SunDeMink assured us that this “hybrid wheat beer” will be hitting the market soon. Southern Tier doesn’t bother with spring seasonal releases, preferring to skip right to summer—which this beer is perfect for, thanks to its crisp wheat character, slightly sharp citric hop and barley sweetness. BeerAdvocate Score: 86 (Recommended)Unearthly Imperial IPADeMink describes Unearthly as “153 IBUs [International Bittering Units], extremely hoppy, but well-balanced.” Oh yeah, this is one helluva big India Pale Ale, with an immense hop character that’s both piney and citrusy. Yet the hops are artfully controlled by a sweet and grainy malt flavor. Together they conceal the 11.0 percent ABV. No official BeerAdvocate Score at this time, but this is clearly a superior IPA. We’re also impressed by Southern Tier’s 22-ounce bombers. Not only are the labels beautifully silk-screened, but they take consumer information to a new level, listing facts about the brewing process and fully disclosing their ingredients to curious beer geeks. Unfortunately, due to prohibitive costs, expiration dates are not stamped on the bottles individually but only on the cases themselves (with the exception of the JAHVA Stout).Southern Tier 6-packs and bombers will be increasingly available at Boston-area liquor stores; meanwhile, you can find them on tap and by the bottle at bars like Cambridge Common, Sunset Grill & Tap and RedBones.For more information, visit www.southerntierbrewing.com


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Monday, July 10, 2006

Reg Lenna Civic Center
116 East Third StreetJamestown14701USA
Tel: (716) 484-7070 (Box Office)Fax:

The Reg Lenna Civic Center was first opened on February 5, 1923 as the Palace Theatre, a "High Class Vaudville" house. Films, usually a short comedy plus a feature, were shown before and after the twice-a-day vaudeville performances. Three years later Nikitas Dipson bought the facility and continued with film and vaudeville shows. In 1930 Dipson leased the Palace to Warner Brothers for 20 years. For a short time the format of films and vaudeville was continued, but live performances were slowly downplayed to emphasize the cinema. By 1934 films were the only entertainment available on a regular basis. In 1950 Warner terminated their lease and Dipson Theatres, still the owners, once again took over management. The Palace was remodeled by installing new heating and cooling systems, carpeting, wall coverings and new seats. At the reopening Dipson reaffirmed his intention to feature not only first run films of the best quality, but also stage shows, orchestras and vaudeville. In 1956, Forever Darling, starring Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz, had it's world premiere at The Palace. With the passing years fewer and fewer people attended the theater, equipment was wearing out, and the building needed repairs. On September 10, 1981, the last movie was shown. Renovation, which began in 1989, included taking out all the seats for reupholster, reconstruction of the orchestra pit, new stage lighting andequipment, new curtains, new house lights, handicapped seating created, new floor coverings, original artwork repaired and cleaned, new stage entrance, new heating and cooling systems, and a new stage floor. The grand reopening was held October 12, 1990.The beautifully restored 1,269 seat Reg Lenna Civic Center received an award from the League of Historic American Theatres for the quality and workmanship of its restoration. It boasts a 35' movie screen, state of the art projection and sound equipment.


For more information on Chautauqua Lake Real Estate & Living visit: www.chautauqualakehomes.com